LRC 2022 NCAA Women’s Day 2 Super Recap: Katelyn Tuohy (15:18), Courtney Wayment (9:16), Abby Steiner (21.80), and Florida Win Their First NCAA Outdoor Titles

by LetsRun.com
June 11, 2022

EUGENE, Ore. – The 2022 NCAA Outdoor Track & Field Championships belonged to the Florida Gators. For the second straight day at Hayward Field, the meet ended with John Anderson presenting coach Mike Holloway with an NCAA championship trophy as the Gators scored 74 points to claim the title. Just as on the men’s side, Texas was the runner-up, scoring 64, the highest non-winning score since 2014.

The win made history as it was the first time Florida had ever won the women’s outdoor title and the first time the school had swept men’s and women’s titles. It was the first sweep by any school since Oregon in 2015.

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The Gators were led by the multi-talented Anna Hall, who won the heptathlon and finished second in the 400 hurdles, and Jasmine Moore, who won the triple and long jump titles. Talitha Diggs also won the 400 in 49.99, becoming just the sixth collegian to break the 50-second barrier.

The top performance of the day belonged to Kentucky’s Abby Steiner, who took .16 off the collegiate record by running a world-leading 21.80 to win the 200 (she also finished second in the 100 and split 48.92 as part of Kentucky’s winning 4×400 relay). The women’s 100 was another highlight as Texas’ Julien Alfred outleaned Oregon’s Kemba Nelson by .005 to win (both women were credited with a time of 11.02).

In the distance events, BYU’s Courtney Wayment was the star as she ran 9:16.00 to slash more than eight seconds off Courtney Frerichs’ collegiate record. NC State’s Katelyn Tuohy impressively won her first NCAA title by running 15:18.39 in the 5,000, while Ole Miss’ Sintayehu Vissa turned the tables on indoor mile champ Micaela DeGenero to win the 1500 in 4:09.42. Boise State’s Kristie Schoffield took the 800 in a pb of 2:01.09.

Full recap and analysis of every event below.

Women’s 5000: Kately Tuohy delivers

Katelyn Tuohyprep phenom NCAA champion.

Tuohy, the NC State sophomore who set four national high school records on the track but didn’t even make this meet last year, ran confidently and impressively from start to finish before taking over during the final 600 to winer her first NCAA title in 15:18.39 as Florida’s redshirt freshman Parker Valby, the SEC runner-up, was runner-up at nationals in 15:20.10, the only woman to finish within 6 seconds of Tuohy.

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The Race

The race was fairly honest from the start thanks to Tuohy who led for the first 8+ laps, taking the field through 1600 in 5:01 and 3200 in 9:59, with Florida’s Valby running right next to her. With 4 laps remaining, the four expected contenders – Tuohy, 10,000 champ Mercy Chelangat of Alabama, indoor 3000 champ Taylor Roe of Oklahoma State and Pac-12 5/10 champ Abby Nichols of Colorado – plus Valby had gapped everyone else, and it was Valby who wanted to run faster. On the backstretch of the fourth-to-last lap, Valby took over the lead and ratcheted down the pace to 71.90, then she ran another 71.94 and with 800 to go Nichols was out of the picture.

Valby’s injection of pace put everyone behind her in single-file and at one point she had 3-4 meters on Tuohy. But Tuohy wasn’t going away and with 600 meters to go, it was Tuohy, the one with the 4:06 1500-meter speed, who wanted to keep the pace honest. Once Tuohy went to the lead, Valby had no response and the final lap was a coronation for Tuohy – the former high school queen now rules the NCAA as she ran her final two laps in 69.18 and 69.31.


Pl Name Affiliation Time
1 Katelyn TUOHY SO NC STATE 15:18.39
2 Parker VALBY FR FLORIDA 15:20.10 PB
3 Taylor ROE SO OKLAHOMA STATE 15:24.41
4 Mercy CHELANGAT JR ALABAMA 15:24.54
5 Lauren GREGORY JR ARKANSAS 15:28.33
6 Abby NICHOLS SR COLORADO 15:33.09
7 Gracelyn LARKIN SO NEW MEXICO 15:33.10
8 Isabel VAN CAMP SO ARKANSAS 15:35.64 PB
9 Marlee STARLIPER FR NC STATE 15:36.51 PB
10 Samantha BUSH JR NC STATE 15:42.61
11 Hannah STEELMAN SR NC STATE 15:43.45
12 Cara WOOLNOUGH JR UTAH 15:45.26
13 Sydney SEYMOUR JR TENNESSEE 15:51.50
14 Emily COVERT FR COLORADO 15:52.99
15 Lucy JENKS SO STANFORD 15:55.19
16 Amelia MAZZA-DOWNIE SO NEW MEXICO 15:58.39 SB
17 Amaris TYYNISMAA SO ALABAMA 15:59.08
18 Emma HECKEL FR NEW MEXICO 16:01.51
19 Eusila CHEPKEMEI SR MID. TENN. STATE 16:01.65
20 Savannah SHAW JR NC STATE 16:02.32
21 Nicole FEGANS SR GEORGIA TECH 16:05.64
22 Bethany HASZ SR MINNESOTA 16:12.58
23 India JOHNSON JR COLORADO 16:16.09
DNF Elizabeth MANCINI JR LA SALLE DNF

Quick Take: Katelyn Tuohy gets it done and is an NCAA champion by the end of her sophomore year

Tuohy has been in the national spotlight since she won NXN in 2017 as a 15-year-old. Over the next two-and-a-half years, she racked up four national records and national titles (she was also a three-time Gatorade XC athlete of the year) and headed to NC State in the fall of 2020 as one of the greatest prospects in the history of US distance running.

That’s a lot of expectations to put on a teenager, and it was made even more difficult when Tuohy developed an injury heading into college, delaying her collegiate debut until February 2021. Her freshman year had its ups (24th at NCAA XC) and downs (failing to qualify for NCAAs outdoors) but she’s been simply sensational as a sophomore, taking 15th at NCAA XC, 2nd in the 3k and 5k indoors, running pbs of 4:06 and 15:14 this spring (both #1 in the NCAA), and capping it all with her first NCAA title.

Moving forward, Tuohy will run either the 1500 or 5000 at USAs but will talk to her coach Laurie Henes before deciding which one.

Quick Take: Tuohy offers advice to the next high school phenom: “Just have fun. That’s the most important thing.”

Tuohy graduated from high school two years ago, but in American distance running, the label of “high school phenom” never totally fades. Athletes like Jim Ryun and Alan Webb accomplished incredible things as professionals, but their high school exploits are talked about to this day. It’s the way the sport operates. Distance fans are always on the lookout for the next big thing, and when their first exposure to an athlete is as a high schooler, that image sticks.

It can create a lot of pressure on an athlete like Tuohy, especially when they’re constantly reminded of – and compared to – the high school stars who didn’t make it at the next level. Henes said Tuohy asked her when people are going to stop asking her about high school. “Probably never,” was Henes’ response.

“You definitely have that in the back of your mind when things aren’t going too well,” Tuohy said. “We joke around at practice that I’m still known as the kid who was good in high school. While high school was super important, I hope future generation sees that you can do well post-high school, post-collegiately. It was not easy.”

Tuohy credited her teammates as the biggest reason for her ability to thrive this year at NC State. The team dynamic at NC State was one of the things that appealed to her when she was deciding where to go for college, and she said this weekend at NCAAs – where she was one of five Wolfpack runners to qualify in the 5,000 – was the most fun she’d ever had on a trip to a meet.

“We’ve just been goofing around, having a blast,” Tuohy said. “It makes it easy.”

When we asked her what advice she’d offer to the next great high school runner looking to make the transition to the next level, the word Tuohy kept coming back to was fun.

“I would just say, don’t listen to what anyone says and just keep doing what you’re doing,” Tuohy said. “Just have fun. That’s the most important thing, is have fun.

Quick take: Props to the North Rockland & NC State staff

Tuohy deserves the majority of the credit for winning the national title, handling all the pressure, and delivering at the NCAA level, but when being a female high school phenom is viewed as almost a red flag, all of Tuohy’s coaches up to this point deserve credit for helping her navigate the difficult transformation from girl high school phenom to young adult women’s NCAA champion.

Quick Take: Unlike most of the other distance events at NCAAs this year, youth was served in the 5,000

The top three finishers in this race – Tuohy, Parker Valby, and Taylor Roe – are all 21 or younger. That stood in stark contrast to most of the other distance events at NCAAs this year. With many athletes receiving an extra year of eligibility due to the cancelled COVID season of 2020, there is a flood of sixth-year athletes in the NCAA right now (something that will remain for the next few years). Add in the usual slew of international athletes and some of the winners this weekend were quite old for college students – five of the 10 winners were 24 or older, and two more were 23.

AthleteAgeEvent
Moad Zahafi24Men’s 800
Joe Waskom20/21*Men’s 1500
Ahmed Jaziri24Men’s steeple
Olin Hacker25Men’s 5,000
Dylan Jacobs21Men’s 10,000
Kristie Schoffield23Women’s 800
Sintayehu Vissa25Women’s 1500
Courtney Wayment23Women’s steeple
Katelyn Tuohy20Women’s 5,000
Mercy Chelangat24Women’s 10,000

*We couldn’t find a birthdate for Waskom, but he graduated high school in 2019 so he has to be either 20 or 21

Quick Take: Parker Valby finished second despite only running 2-3x per week

Valby fractured two bones in her foot in January and missed a significant amount of time as she rehabbed the injury. She didn’t finish a race outdoors until May 14 – when she ran a huge pb of 15:32 to finish second at SECs. That was her first week back of running.

Since then, Valby has barely been running on solid ground – she does two workouts per week on land and has done a grand total of two easy runs – with the rest of her training coming in the pool or on the elliptical or Arc Trainer. Long-term she hopes to get back to more running, but with the Gators in the hunt for the team title, the coaching staff wanted to give her a chance to compete at NCAAs and this was the solution. It worked nicely as Valby contributed eight points to the Gators’ winning score.

Women’s 1500: Vissa gets revenge on DeGenero

Heading into the women’s 1500, we expected to see a battle between indoor winner Micaela DeGenero of Colorado and indoor runner-up Sintayehu Vissa of Ole Miss and that’s exactly what we got as the two battled it out over the final 200, before Vissa got some revenge and the win in 4:09.42 with DeGenero second in 4:09.62.

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Vissa was up front throughout running in second as Arkansas’ Krissy Gear led for the first 1250 meters, taking the field through splits of 66, 2:16, and 3:32 high. DeGenero was in the back of the pack after the first lap and at 1200 she was just in 9th but she made a massive move to the front and pulled up on Vissa’s shoulder with a little less than 200 to go. Visa responded and didn’t let DeGenero get by. For the final 190 meters, they ran almost side by side but with Vissa just a couple meters ahead until Vissa put a few more meters on DeGenero in the final 15 meters.

Pl Name Affiliation Time
1 Sintayehu VISSA SO OLE MISS 4:09.42
2 Micaela DEGENERO SR COLORADO 4:09.62 SB
3 Christina ARAGON SR STANFORD 4:10.00 SB
4 Krissy GEAR SR ARKANSAS 4:10.06 SB
5 Julia HEYMACH SR STANFORD 4:10.58 SB
6 Emily MACKAY SR BINGHAMTON 4:11.10 PB
7 Shannon FLOCKHART FR PROVIDENCE 4:11.11
8 Eusila CHEPKEMEI SR MID. TENN. STATE 4:11.44 PB
9 Olivia HOWELL SO ILLINOIS 4:12.22 SB
10 Maia RAMSDEN FR HARVARD 4:12.46 PB
11 Ellie LEATHER SR CINCINNATI 4:13.37
12 Melissa TANAKA JR STANFORD 4:21.28

Quick Take: Vissa used the lessons of NCAAs past to propel herself to victory today

Vissa was second indoors in the mile but felt that the pressure of her first NCAA final got to her a bit mentally as she got thrown out of her rhythm with every move that was made. This time  she was a lot calmer and when DeGenero made her big move on the final lap, she was ready for it.

Vissa also watched her Ole Miss teammate Mario Garcia Romo finish second on Friday after getting boxed in on the last lap and resolved to stay on the outside in today’s race, even if that meant running extra distance at times.

“I’d rather [run extra] meters than be stuck,” Vissa said. “I’m not that good as him. I would get paranoid [on the rail].”

Quick Take: Micaela DeGenero finished second despite having by far the fastest last lap in the field

DeGenero covered her final 400 in 61.21, much faster than Vissa’s 61.91. Difference was, Vissa was second at the bell and DeGenero ninth. DeGenero was last with just over 400 to go indoors before launching her big move to win the mile, but even when you have the best kick in the field – which DeGenero does – you’re playing with fire when you leave yourself that much work to do. The other thing that may have factored in is the pace was pretty quick today (DeGenero ran 4:09.62; her pb is 4:09.38). It’s harder to be near the front (and harder to kick) when you’re running close to PR pace.

DeGenero, for her part, felt her mistake was not passing Vissa on the final turn.

“I should have just blown by her but I thought maybe I could save something for the last 100,” DeGenero said.

Women’s Steeplechase: Courtney Wayment crushes NCAA record

Last year, BYU’s Courtney Wayment went into NCAAs having run more than five seconds (5.37) faster than anyone else on the year but disappointed and only ended up 4th. This year, she came into NCAAs having run more than five seconds (5.26) faster than everyone else and lived up to expectations and then some. She totally obliterated the field and Courtney Frerichs’ NCAA and meet record of 9:24.41 by running 9:16.00 (previous pb of 9:23.09) to capture her third individual NCAA crown and her first outdoors. She’s now the fifth-fastest American in history.

Yale’s Kayley DeLay ran an even bigger PB to capture second in 9:25.08 (previous pb of 9:40.81) as West Virginia’s Ceilia McCabe was third in 9:31.14. In all, 10 of the 12 women in the race ran personal bests despite rain falling throughout the race.

The race 

After a 76-second lap from 600 to 1k, Wayment put the throttle down and ran 74 seconds or faster all the way home — 74.73, 74.54, 73.36, 73.23. 70.83 — and no one was close to her as she had already gapped the field by 2+ seconds with 4 laps remaining. DeLay, the Yale senior who will be running at Washington as a grad student next year, ended up gapping the chase pack by the time 3 laps remained.

Pl Name Affiliation Time
1 Courtney WAYMENT SR BYU 9:16.00 CR
2 Kayley DELAY JR YALE 9:25.08 PB
3 Ceili MCCABE SO WEST VIRGINIA 9:31.14 PB
4 Madison BOREMAN JR COLORADO 9:33.02 PB
5 Elise THORNER SO NEW MEXICO 9:33.99
6 Kaylee MITCHELL JR OREGON STATE 9:34.59 PB
7 Logan JOLLY SR ARKANSAS 9:34.76 PB
8 Adva COHEN SR NEW MEXICO 9:35.60 PB
9 Olivia MARKEZICH SO NOTRE DAME 9:35.80 PB
10 Grace FETHERSTONHAUGHJR OREGON STATE 9:37.56 PB
11 Alissa NIGGEMANN SR WISCONSIN 9:39.96 PB
12 Joyce KIMELI SR AUBURN 9:41.48 

Quick Take: A year delayed, Wayment DOMINATES as expected, becomes the US leader

With global medallists Emma Coburn and Courtney Frerichs normally leading the way, the US is very strong in the women’s steeple. But Coburn and Frerichs haven’t been great this year and Wayment now finds herself #1 in the US two weeks before USAs.

1. 9:16.00 Courtney Wayment
2. 9:18.19 Emma Coburn
3. 9:20.96 Courtney Frerichs
4. 9:25.48 Annie Rodenfels

Wayment said a number of things went wrong in last year’s NCAA steeple final – she was sick the week before, she went a little too hard in the prelims and made the wrong moves in the final. This year, everything went right and the result was a humongous pb.

Wayment is out of eligibility after six years at BYU and will plan to join coach Diljeet Taylor’s burgeoning pro group featuring fellow BYU NCAA champs Whittni Orton and Anna Camp Bennett. Wayment and Taylor have a special connection as they both started at BYU in the same year, the fall of 2016. Their very first conversation was actually about the steeplechase. Even though Wayment never ran it in high school, she felt it would be her event in college (it helped that her father, Mark, was a two-time All-American in the steeple at Weber State in 1985 and 1986).

“I was like, ‘Just so you know, I’m a steepler – do you know how to coach steeple?’” Wayment said she told Taylor. “She was like, ‘Yeah. How do you know you’re a steepler?’ I was like, ‘I don’t know. I just know.’”

Quick Take: Kayley DeLay went from a time qualifier for the final to the third-fastest collegian in history

DeLay was only 6th in her prelim on Thursday, needing a time qualifier to advance after running 9:43. Pretty in line with what you’d expect from someone whose pb is 9:40.

But that result looks positively bizarre considering what DeLay did in today’s final, running 9:25 to take second. She said after the race today that she had been hoping to break through to the 9:30s for a while now but wasn’t expecting this big of a breakthrough.

So what happened in the prelim? DeLay wasn’t totally sure, she just knew she felt a lot better on the start line today than she did on Thursday.

“I just shook it off and said it’s a different race and I’m glad I get to do it again,” DeLay said. “I don’t really know what came over me to just try to chase Courtney if I could. She made a hard move and no one went with her, so I was like, well, I might as well try.”

DeLay has an extra year of eligibility but since the Ivy League doesn’t allow grad athletes, she’s heading off to the University of Washington.

Women’s 800: Kristie Schoffield’s dream becomes reality

Redshirt senior Kristie Schoffield of Boise State covered her face in disbelief at the end of the 800. Then she fell to the track in disbelief. But it was not just a dream. Schoffield, who up until a month ago hadn’t broken 2:05 in nearly three years, was the winner of the 2022 NCAA women’s 800 in impressive fashion in a personal-best time of 2:01.09. Villanova senior Keegan McKenna moved up one spot from indoors and ended up best of the rest in second in 2:01.71, with 22-year-old freshman Gabija Galvydyte of Oklahoma State third in 2:01.76

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The Race

Aaliyah Miller of Baylor, the 2021 indoor champ, took things out hard as expected and had a big lead at 400 (57.62) with Schoffield leading the chase pack at 58.82.

At 600 (1:28.9) Miller still led by roughly a second but around the turn Schoffield was still leading the chase pack and soon started making up a lot of ground. She flew by Miller at the top of the homestretch and it was no contest the rest of the way. 

Miller faded all the way back to seventh and Imogen Barrett of Florida, who was closest to Schoffield at the top of the turn, ran out of steam and would get fourth. Keegan of Villanova would go from fifth to second the final 100m, just passing Oklahoma State’s Galvydyte before the line.

Pl Name Affiliation Time
1 Kristie SCHOFFIELD SR BOISE STATE 2:01.09 PB
2 McKenna KEEGAN SR VILLANOVA 2:01.71 SB
3 Gabija GALVYDYTE FR OKLAHOMA STATE 2:01.76 PB
4 Imogen BARRETT JR FLORIDA 2:02.05
5 Sarah HENDRICK JR KENNESAW STATE 2:02.19
6 Valery TOBIAS JR TEXAS 2:02.74
7 Aaliyah MILLER SR BAYLOR 2:03.05
8 Katy-Ann MCDONALD JR LSU 2:03.57
9 Gabrielle WILKINSON JR FLORIDA 2:06.40

Quick Take: Perseverance pays off for Schoffield

Schoffield was very good in high school, running 2:06.90 to win the New England title as a senior from New Hampshire in 2017. As a freshman at Boise State, she improved to 2:05.18 in 2018 and as a sophomore had a nice breakthrough to 2:02.65 in 2019, the only other year she ever made an NCAA final and scored (6th). Then she went backwards, running 2:09 in 2020 and 2:05 in 2021.

Indoors this year, she was 36th on the NCAA list and didn’t break 2:05 once again. Heading into last month’s Mountain West Conference meet, she hadn’t broken 2:05 in nearly three years – 2 years, 11 months, and 6 days, to be exact. At Mountain West, she ran 2:02.45 to win. She improved to 2:01.41 at regionals, ran another 2:01 in the semis here two day ago (2:01.79) and now is your NCAA champion at 2:01.09.

Quick Take: Aaliyah Miller is optimistic about her future

Baylor’s Aaliyah Miller won NCAA indoors in 2021 by running 2:00.69 – tied for the second-fastest time ever by a collegian indoors behind only Athing Mu. Miller, a big talent in high school (she took silver at World U20s in 2016), had reached a whole new level. But she has not been able to stay at that level since then, as she didn’t make the NCAA outdoor final last year and raced sparingly indoors this season.
Miller, however, feels good about where she is at. She said that she was healthy indoors and that her limited indoor schedule was by design to peak better outdoors and is looking forward to what she can do post-collegiately.

As for today, we imagine some may think she ran a tactically poor race as she went out so fast — 27.6 and then 57.6. But when she won NCAA indoors in 2021, she went out even faster (27.69, 56.90, 1:27.49), and won in 2:00.69 – a time that would have won today.

Sprints

Women’s 4 x 100: Texas comes through as the favorite

The two fastest teams during the regular season went 1-2 in this one as Texas won in 42.42 with Kentucky second in 42.55

Pl Team Time
1 TEXAS 42.42
2 KENTUCKY 42.55
3 OREGON 42.59 SB
4 LSU 42.62
5 FLORIDA STATE 43.18
6 OHIO STATE 43.52
7 UCF 43.69
8 COASTAL CAROLINA 43.78
DQ SOUTH CAROLINA DQ [15.9c

Women’s 100H: The favorite Alia Armstrong delivers

LSU’s Alia Armstrong went into NCAA indoors as the collegiate leader but false started and didn’t get the win. Today, the outdoor collegiate leader (12.33, +2.5) had no such problems as she led throughout and won comfortably in 12.57 as USC’s Jasmine Jones was second in 12.66.

This was actually the first time Armstrong had scored at NCAAs as she didn’t make the final last year as a frosh.

Pl Name Affiliation Time

1 Alia ARMSTRONG SO LSU 12.57
2 Jasmine JONES SO USC 12.66 PB
3 Masai RUSSELL JR KENTUCKY 12.81
4 Paula SALMON SR N. CAROLINA A&T 12.85
5 Kaylah ROBINSON SR TEXAS A&M 12.86
6 Destiny HUVEN SO WISCONSIN 12.92
7 Demisha ROSWELL JR TEXAS TECH 12.94
8 Destinee ROCKER SR SOUTH CAROLINA 13.07
DQ Rayniah JONES SO UCF DQ

Women’s 100: NCAA leader Julien Alfred wins it

Texas sophomore Julien Alfred and Oregon senior Kemba Nelson were lined up next to each other at the start and hardly anything separated them for the entire 100 meters. But in the end Alfred got the narrow win as both were timed in 11.02 with Abby Steiner of Kentucky third in 11.08.

Pl Name Affiliation Time +0.2m/s
1 Julien ALFRED SO TEXAS 11.02 [11.014]
2 Kemba NELSON SR OREGON 11.02 [11.020]
3 Abby STEINER JR KENTUCKY 11.08
4 Rosemary CHUKWUMA SO TEXAS TECH 11.14
5 Favour OFILI SO LSU 11.17
6 Grace NWOKOCHA FR N. CAROLINA A&T 11.21
7 Kevona DAVIS SO TEXAS 11.22
8 Melissa JEFFERSON SO COASTAL CAROLINA 11.24
9 Joella LLOYD SO TENNESSEE 11.29

Women’s 400: Diggs wins again

Indoor NCAA 400m champ Talitha Diggs of Florida, who ran the fastest semi in meet history on Thursday (50.08), was even better this afternoon as she got the win in a personal best of 49.99. Indoors Diggs, who is the daughter of four-time 800m Olympian Joetta Clark Diggs, was 3rd at SECs but 1st at NCAAs and outdoors she did the same thing as she was 4th at SECs but 1st at NCAAs.

Pl Name Affiliation Time
1 Talitha DIGGS SO FLORIDA 49.99 PB
2 Charokee YOUNG SO TEXAS A&M 50.65
3 Kennedy SIMON JR TEXAS 50.69
4 Alexis HOLMES JR KENTUCKY 50.71 PB
5 Stacey Ann WILLIAMS JR TEXAS 51.13
6 Shae ANDERSON SR UCLA 51.50
7 Rosey EFFIONG FR ARKANSAS 51.55
8 Kavia FRANCIS FR BAYLOR 52.16
9 Makenzie DUNMORE SR SOUTH CAROLINA 54.73

Women’s 400H: Britton Wilson cruises

Arkansas’ NCAA leader Britton Wilson, who won the 400 and 400 hurdles at SECs, dominated the women’s hurdles with a 53.86 as heptathlon champ Anna Hall closed hard to get second in 54.76 for Florida.

Pl Name Affiliation Time
1 Britton WILSON SO ARKANSAS 53.86
2 Anna HALL SO FLORIDA 54.76
3 Lauren HOFFMAN SR DUKE 55.58
4 Masai RUSSELL JR KENTUCKY 55.83
5 Deshae WISE SR TEXAS A&M 55.99 =PB
6 Bianca STUBLER SR WISCONSIN 56.49
7 Vanessa WATSON SO FLORIDA 56.83 [56.821]
8 Shannon MEISBERGER SR ARIZONA 56.83 [56.825]
9 Jessica WRIGHT JR HOWARD 58.12

Women’s 200: Abby Steiner DESTROYS the collegiate record

Collegiate record holder Favour Ofili of LSU got off to a good start but Kentucky’s Abby Steiner was sensational coming off the turn and over the final 150 as she got the win in a collegiate record of 21.80 (0+1.3), destroying Ofili and her 21.96 collegiate record in the process. Ofili was second in 22.05 with Olympian Anavia Battle of Ohio State third in 22.33.

Pl Name Affiliation Time
1 Abby STEINER JR KENTUCKY 21.80 CR
2 Favour OFILI SO LSU 22.05
3 Anavia BATTLE SR OHIO STATE 22.33
4 Kynnedy FLANNEL JR TEXAS 22.35
5 Kevona DAVIS SO TEXAS 22.50
6 Grace NWOKOCHA FR N. CAROLINA A&T 22.52
7 Edidiong ODIONG SR FLORIDA STATE 22.70
8 Joella LLOYD SO TENNESSEE 22.80
9 Melissa JEFFERSON SO COASTAL CAROLINA 22.90 

Women’s 4 x 400: Abby Steiner (48.92) and Kentucky bring it

Kentucky, who set the NCAA record of 3:21.93 earlier this year, got the win in 3:22.55 thanks to a sensational third leg from Abby Steiner, who split 48.92 and took her team from roughly 20 meters back in fourth to first. 

Pl Team Time
1 KENTUCKY 3:22.55
2 TEXAS 3:23.35
3 ARKANSAS 3:23.69
4 TEXAS A&M 3:24.55
5 SOUTH CAROLINA 3:25.78
6 HOWARD 3:28.39 SB
7 UCLA 3:28.71 SB
8 BAYLOR 3:28.89
9 FLORIDA 3:31.1

Field Events

High Jump: Texas A&M’s Lamara Distin wins in style

Indoor champ and NCAA leader Lamara Distin of Texas A&M got the win as she was the only one over 1.95 and she got there without a miss before missing three times at a collegiate record of 2.00m. Texas’ Tyra Gittens, who came in seeded #2 and is a former indoor NCAA HJ champ when she competed for Texas A&M, only cleared 1.80 and didn’t score. *Results

Women’s Discus: Jorinde Van Klinken dominates

NCAA leader Jorinde Van Klinken of Arizona State successfully defended her title and won by more than 12 feet at 61.26m as Kansas’ Alexandra Emilianov was second at 58.44. Van Klinken set the meet record in this event last year at 65.01 and was second in the shot put two days ago. *Results

Women’s Triple Jump: Jasmine Moore wins again

Florida sophomore Jasmine Moore completed the double-double as she won her fourth NCAA jumping crown of the year (LJ/TJ indoors and out) with a 14.32m leap as Texas Tech’s Ruth Usoro was second at 13.95. Moore had two jumps over 14 meters for good measure. *Results

Women’s Heptathlon: Anna Hall wins

Florida’s Anna Hall got the win with 6385 points but the fact that she ran the 400 hurdle final (2nd place) less than 25 minutes before the heptathlon 800 meant she didn’t go for Diane Guthrie’s NCAA meet record of 6527.

Guthrie’s record is the only NCAA mark set before the year 2000 (1985) and Hall, who has a 2:03 800 pb, would have needed to run 2:11 flat to break it but she ran 2:21.23.

Hall’s 18 points were critical to the Gators’ team title and it also won the program $1,000. After Sarah Lorge Butler tweeted about Hall’s double a few days ago, actor Kevin Barbaro (the former Toledo coach who was known as Kevin Hadsell before he resigned after a scandal)  tweeted, “And people are ‘shocked’ that kids enter the transfer portal. I will bet $1000 that she score less points than she’s projected.”

Well Hall scored 18 and it didn’t take long for the Gators to tweet, “Pay up.” Barbaro has said he’ll donate $1,000 to the Gators program.

For the record, Hall said she had to talk the coaches into letting her do the 400H/heptathlon double.

Texas’ Kristine Blazevica, who scored more than 6000 points in the regular season, fouled three times in the long jump and didn’t score. Had she scored 6000, she would have been second and had Tyra Gittens gotten second in the high jump, Texas would have won the team title. *Results

Women’s Team: Florida women win their first outdoor title

The Florida women upset pre-meet favorite Texas 74-64 to complete the indoor/outdoor sweep and win the outdoor title for the first time in women’s team history. Prior to this year, head coach Mike Holloway had won 9 national titles but all 9 were on the men’s side. Now that total is up to 12 with the women winning both indoors and out this year and the men winning yesterday.

Top 10 Teams

1    UF 74
2    TEX 64
3    UK 50
4    LSU 39
4    TAMU 39
6    ARK 38
7    TTU 36
8    AZST 28
9    BYU 21
9    COLO 21

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More: Complete 2022 NCAA Coverage.

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