2021 Ostrava Recap: Kiplimo Blitzes 26:33 (#7 All-Time) as Cheptegei Comes Up Short In WR Attempt (7:33) and British Teens Max Burgin (1:44.14) & Keely Hodgkinson (1:58.89) Amaze

By LetsRun.com
May 19, 2021

The Ostrava Golden Spike meet, part of the World Athletics Continental Tour Gold series, always attracts some of the biggest stars in the sport, and the 2021 edition held this evening put several of today’s biggest talents on display, led by a pair of Ugandan distance runners.

Joshua Cheptegei earned the pre-race headlines by targeting Daniel Komen’s 7:20.67 world record in the 3000 meters, but that attempt fizzled as Cheptegei could manage just 7:33.24. Instead, it was his countryman Jacob Kiplimo who stole the show, running 26:33.93 (13:27/13:06 splits) to become the seventh-fastest man in history over 10,000 meters.

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In other action, there were big wins for British teenagers Max Burgin (1:44.14) and Keely Hodgkinson (1:58.89) in the 800s, another victory for Sha’Carri Richardson in the 200 (22.35), and a statement win by Fred Kerley, who ran 9.96 to dominate a 100m field that included Justin Gatlin and Andre De Grasse.

Full meet recap and analysis below.

*Results

Men’s 3000: Cheptegei runs 7:33 as Daniel Komen’s world record survives

Joshua Cheptegei knew going into tonight’s race that breaking Daniel Komen’s 7:20.67 3000-meter world record would be harder than either of the Kenenisa Bekele records he took down in 2020. And that proved to be the case, as despite decent conditions, his record attempt fizzled over the second half and Cheptegei had to settle for 7:33.24, a slight improvement on his 7:33.26 pb.

Cheptegei made a brave effort. Following ace pacemaker Stewart McSweyn of Australia — a 7:28 man himself — Cheptegei was right with the pacing lights through the first half of the race, hitting 1500 in 3:39 and 1600 in 3:55. However, a gap started to open between McSweyn and Cheptegei. The gap narrowed but that may have been because McSweyn slowed it down as after a high-60 5th lap (WR pace is 58.7 per 400), Cheptegei hit 2k in 4:56.19, two plus seconds behind the required split of 4:53.78. 

Cheptegei faced an impossible task – he needed to pick it up while running totally alone over the final 1k. The pacing lights, moving remarkably quickly — seriously, how the hell did Komen run this fast? — soon zoomed away from Cheptegei. After a 61.6 penultimate lap, he totally packed it in during the final lap (65+) as he ran his final kilometer in 2:37.05 to clock 7:33.24. He was still well clear of the rest of the field, as American Paul Chelimo — who tried to hang with Cheptegei early but backed off before 1k — was second in 7:41.69.

Results
1. Joshua CHEPTEGEI 12 SEP 1996 UGA 7:33.24
2. Paul CHELIMO 27 OCT 1990 USA 7:41.69
3. Oscar CHELIMO 12 DEC 2001 UGA 7:43.00
4. Seán TOBIN 20 JUL 1994 IRL 7:49.37
5. Isaac KIMELI 09 MAR 1994 BEL 7:49.47
6. Andreas VOJTA 09 JUN 1989 AUT 7:49.75
7. Abdessamad OUKHELFEN 18 DEC 1998 ESP 8:07.68
8. Vojtěch KRÁL 04 JUL 1988 CZE 8:20.61
Richard DOUMA 17 APR 1993 NED DNF
Stewart MCSWEYN 01 JUN 1995 AUS DNF

Quick Take: Props to Cheptegei for giving it a go, but Komen is a legend for a reason

Cheptegei broke world records at both 5,000 and 10,000 meters last year and made them look easy — a simple matter of setting the pacing lights to the desired tempo and following them to the history books. Of course it’s not that easy, and we got a reminder tonight. Even with the lights and Nike’s supershoes, Cheptegei was no match for the ghost of Komen over the final kilometer.

Cheptegei deserves credit for shooting big and bringing some excitement to the race, but the fact that a runner as great as him — someone who has run 12:35 for 5,000 meters — could make a genuine attempt at the record and fall off so badly is a reminder of just how impressive Komen’s 7:20.67 is. Watching the pacing lights whip around, it seemed impossible that someone could manage that unrelenting tempo for a full three kilometers. Hopefully tonight’s run helped a new generation of fans appreciate just how magnificent Daniel Komen was at his best.

Men’s 10,000: Kiplimo moves to #7 all-time with incredible solo run

Ugandan superstar Jacob Kiplimo started the meet with a bang by blitzing a 26:33.93 10k to become the seventh-fastest man in history. Kiplimo had company through the first 5k, hitting halfway in 13:27.43. But it turns out the best rabbit was Kiplimo himself, as he ratcheted the pace down over the second half, splitting 13:06.50 totally alone. Outside of Joshua Cheptegei’s 26:11.00 world record last year, it was the fastest time recorded since Kenenisa Bekele’s famous 26:25.97 at the 2008 Prefontaine Classic.

Interestingly, Kiplimo was not wearing Nike’s next-generation superspikes in the race, opting for an old pair of Nike Mambas. 

Here is where Kiplimo fits in on the all-time world list at 10,000:

  1. 26:11.00 Joshua Cheptegei, Uganda 2020
    2. 26:27.53 Kenenisa Bekele, Ethiopia 2005
    3. 26:22.75 Haile Gebrselassie, Ethiopia 1998
    4. 26:27.85 Paul Tergat, Kenya 1997
    5. 26:30.03 Nicholas Kembeoi, Kenya 2003
    6. 26:30.75 Abebe Dinkesa, Ethiopia 2005
    7. 26:33.93 Jacob Kiplimo, Uganda 2021
    8. 26:35.63 Micah Kogo, Kenya 2006
    9. 26:36.26 Paul Koech, Kenya 1997
    10. 26:37.25 Zersenay Tadese, Eritrea 2006

Kiplimo surprised himself with the time, telling the AFP, “I did not expect such a time, I was hoping for something under 27. The seventh time in history is something I really did not even think about.”

Results
1. Jacob KIPLIMO 14 NOV 2000 UGA 26:33.93
2. Birhanu BALEW 27 FEB 1996 BRN 27:07.49
3. Iliass AOUANI 29 SEP 1995 ITA 27:45.81
4. Juan Antonio PÉREZ 06 NOV 1988 ESP 27:46.08
5. Mehdi FRERE 27 JUL 1996 FRA 28:09.68
6. Abdallah Kibet MANDE 10 MAY 1995 UGA 28:20.91
7. Aras KAYA 04 APR 1994 TUR 28:45.48
8. Sezgin ATAÇ 21 MAR 1998 TUR 28:49.94
9. Emil MILLÁN DE LA OLIVA 24 JUL 2001 SWE 29:25.76
Adam DVOŘÁČEK 10 MAY 1996 CZE DNF
Peter KIPROTICH 20 DEC 1998 KEN DNF
Youssef TAOUSSI 08 DEC 1994 ESP DNF

Quick Take: This should be quite a summer of racing for Kiplimo

Kiplimo was in terrific form in 2020, running 7:26 and 12:48 on the track and winning the World Half Marathon title on the roads. In those races, he beat Jakob Ingebrigtsen (3000), Selemon Barega (5000), and Kibiwott Kandie/Joshua Cheptegei (half marathon) — quite a collection of scalps. He will be must-watch TV whichever event he runs in 2021.

Per Cathal Dennehy, Kiplimo will face Ugandan countryman Cheptegei over 5,000 meters in Florence on June 10. That should be one of the races of the year. 

MB: Jacob Kiplimo 26:33 NOT in super spikes

Women’s 800: Teen sensation Keely Hodgkinson looks great and breaks 1:59 for the first time

19-year-old Keely Hodgkinson was one of the revelations of the 2021 indoor season, claiming the European title and running a pb of 1:59.03. She opened up her outdoor season with a 53.73 400 on May 8 in Stretford, but today was her first time competing in her signature event outdoors in 2021, and she didn’t disappoint, using a dominant final 200 meters to win the 800 in a pb of 1:58.89. That takes almost a second off of Charlotte Moore’s previous outdoor British U20 record of 1:59.75 — set four months after Hodgkinson was born in 2002.

1. Keely HODGKINSON 03 MAR 2002 GBR 1:58.89 AJR*
2. Diribe WELTEJI 13 MAY 2002 ETH 1:59.79
3. Lovisa LINDH 09 JUL 1991 SWE 2:01.10
4. Lore HOFFMANN 25 JUL 1996 SUI 2:02.48
5. Hedda HYNNE 13 MAR 1990 NOR 2:02.48
6. Nadia POWER 11 JAN 1998 IRL 2:02.72
7. Noélie YARIGO 26 DEC 1985 BEN 2:02.99
8. Anita HORVAT 07 SEP 1996 SLO 2:03.29
9. Kimberley FICENEC 23 JUL 1994 CZE 2:04.45
10. Vendula HLUCHÁ 18 FEB 1997 CZE 2:05.30
Gabriela GAJANOVÁ 12 OCT 1999 SVK DNF
Angelika CICHOCKA 15 MAR 1988 POL DNF
Kateřina HÁLOVÁ 25 JUN 1981 CZE DNF

Men’s 800: Max Burgin Dominates and PRs

Burgin is happy

Britain’s Max Burgin gave himself an early 19th birthday present (his birthday is tomorrow) as he was the only guy to go with the rabbit (50.20) and was rewarded with a big PB, win and world lead. He lowered his pb from 1:44.75 to 1:44.14 as the Netherlands’ Tony Van Diepen was second in 1:45.36, ahead of Jake Wighman, who was third (1:45.74).

Former 400 hurdler Patryk Dobek of Poland, who only took up the event as a pro this year and was undefeated indoors, lost his first pro 700 ever but did PR in 1:45.88 for 5th (previous pb of 1:46.81).

Results
1. Max BURGIN 20 MAY 2002 GBR 1:44.14 AJR*
2. Tony VAN DIEPEN 17 APR 1996 NED 1:45.36
3. Jake WIGHTMAN 11 JUL 1994 GBR 1:45.47
4. Mateusz BORKOWSKI 02 APR 1997 POL 1:45.74
5. Patryk DOBEK 13 FEB 1994 POL 1:45.88
6. Saúl ORDÓÑEZ 10 APR 1994 ESP 1:46.23
7. John FITZSIMONS 05 MAY 1998 IRL 1:46.62
8. Amel TUKA 09 JAN 1991 BIH 1:46.64
9. Filip ŠNEJDR 16 APR 1995 CZE 1:46.68
10. Adam KSZCZOT 02 SEP 1989 POL 1:47.49
11. Mark ENGLISH 18 MAR 1993 IRL 1:47.85
12. Adisu GIRMA 10 DEC 1999 ETH 1:48.48
Tadeáš PLAČEK 22 MAR 2003 CZE DNF

Quick Take: The biggest surprise was who didn’t run well here

Burgin has been a teen phenom for a while and he continues to live up to the hype. What was more surprising in this one was how badly some of the bigger names ran.

Amel Tuka, the 2019 world championship runner-up, only managed 1:46.64 for 8th, while Adam Kszczot, the 2015 and 2017 world championship silver medallist, only ran 1:47.49 for 10th. 

Women’s 1500: Hailu wins it

No one went with the pacemakers, who were tasked with running a very aggressive 3:55 place and came through even faster (61.42 at 400). Instead, Genzebe Dibaba led the field through 800 in 2:11. By the bell, the field remained closely bunched, but Dibaba had surrendered the lead to fellow Ethiopian Hirut Meshesha, who was then passed by another Ethiopian, Freweyni Hailu, on the backstraight.

Hailu pulled away to win comfortably in the end in 4:04.20, taking almost two seconds off her 4:05.91 pb from last year and hitting the Olympic standard on the nose. Dibaba, meanwhile, totally ran out of gas after she was passed and wound up dropping out of the race on the final lap.

Results
1. Freweyni HAILU 12 FEB 2001 ETH 4:04.20
2. Maruša MIŠMAŠ-ZRIMŠEK 24 OCT 1994 SLO 4:07.50
3. Hirut MESHESHA 20 JAN 2001 ETH 4:07.52
4. Gaia SABBATINI 10 JUN 1999 ITA 4:08.14
5. Esther GUERRERO 07 FEB 1990 ESP 4:08.24
6. Diana MEZULIÁNÍKOVÁ 10 APR 1992 CZE 4:08.37
7. Winnie NANYONDO 23 AUG 1993 UGA 4:08.44
8. Elena BURKARD 10 FEB 1992 GER 4:09.19
9. Britt UMMELS 24 AUG 1993 NED 4:09.52
10. Simona VRZALOVÁ 07 APR 1988 CZE 4:12.78
11. Renata PLIŚ 05 FEB 1985 POL 4:21.33
Zdeňka SEIDLOVÁ 02 APR 1997 CZE DNF
Genzebe DIBABA 08 FEB 1991 ETH DNF
Hiwot MEHARI 27 AUG 2002 ETH DNF

Quick Take: The pacing situation in this race was a disaster

If you’re going to tell the pacemakers to run 3:55 pace, you better be sure someone is going to run with it otherwise you get a total mess like the race today. Of course it didn’t help that the pacers ran faster than they were supposed to, but no one in this field had any desire to run 3:55 today.

This either falls on the race director (for assigning the rabbit to go too fast) or one of the athletes for requesting a pace that they clearly weren’t capable of running. If it is the latter situation, Dibaba is likely to blame, as she is the only athlete in the field with a pb faster than 3:59.

Speaking of Dibaba, she has now lined up for two races in 2021 and dropped out of both of them. Not great for her Olympic medal chances — but good news for Shelby Houlihan and the rest of the women’s 1500 field. Of course, Houlihan hasn’t even run a race at all in 2021.

Men’s 1500: Marcin Lewandowski wins

Two-time indoor European 1500 bronze medallist Jesús Gómez of Spain had the lead at the bell and he maintained it until the final 100 when he was challenged by Marcin Lewandowski, the bronze medallist at worlds in 2019. Gómez did a good job of trying to hold Lewandowski off but in the end the more credentialed Lewandowski got the win in 3:35.57 to Gómez’s 3:35.70.

Behind them 8 other men broke 3:38 as athletes are desperate to try to run fairly fast and pink up world ranking points.

Results
1. Marcin LEWANDOWSKI 13 JUN 1987 POL 3:35.57
2. Jesús GÓMEZ 24 APR 1991 ESP 3:35.70
3. Samuel ABATE 09 MAR 1999 ETH 3:36.32
4. Ignacio FONTES 22 JUN 1998 ESP 3:36.48
5. Charles GRETHEN 02 JUN 1992 LUX 3:36.75
6. István SZÖGI 12 SEP 1995 HUN 3:36.83
7. Ismael DEBJANI 25 SEP 1990 BEL 3:36.86
8. Michał ROZMYS 13 MAR 1995 POL 3:37.10
9. Filip SASÍNEK 08 JAN 1996 CZE 3:37.21
10. Luke MCCANN 12 MAR 1998 IRL 3:37.77
11. Alexis MIELLET 05 MAY 1995 FRA 3:38.15
12. Jakub HOLUŠA 20 FEB 1988 CZE 3:38.19
13. Jan FRIŠ 19 DEC 1995 CZE 3:38.88
14. Quentin TISON 16 APR 1996 FRA 3:39.06
15. Simon DENISSEL 22 MAY 1990 FRA 3:41.65
16. Rorey HUNTER 02 FEB 1993 AUS 3:42.29
Jan SÝKORA 18 MAY 1992 CZE DNF
Adam CZERWIŃSKI 02 OCT 1988 POL DNF
Paul ROBINSON 24 MAY 1991 IRL DNF

Men’s steeple: Wale dominates

As the only man in the field to have run faster than 8:12, 2019 Diamond League champ Getnet Wale of Ethiopia (8:05 pb), who ran 7:24 for the flat 3k indoors, was the heavy favorite and backed up that status, getting out to an early lead and running most of the race on his own to win in a world-leading 8:09.47.

The real drama came behind him, as four Europeans — Great Britain’s Phil Norman (8:20.12), Italy’s Osama Zoghlami (8:20.29), Spain’s Daniel Arce (8:21.53), and Italy’s Ahmed Abdelwahed (8:21.54) — were all able to hit the 8:22.00 Olympic standard. It was particularly important for Norman and Abdelwahed, neither of whom had the standard going in.

Per Jon Mulkeen, Norman’s time was the fastest by a Brit in 27 years — and the latest breakthrough in a remarkable journey. At the time of the last Olympics in 2016, Norman had never broken 9:00 in a steeple. Now he’s an 8:20 guy, and considering he’s one of just two Brits with the standard, the 31-year-old seems poised to earn a spot in Tokyo.

Results
1. Getnet WALE 16 JUL 2000 ETH 8:09.47
2. Phil NORMAN 20 OCT 1989 GBR 8:20.12
3. Osama ZOGHLAMI 19 JUN 1994 ITA 8:20.29
4. Daniel ARCE 22 APR 1992 ESP 8:21.53
5. Ahmed ABDELWAHED 26 MAY 1996 ITA 8:21.54
6. Boniface Abel SIKOWO 27 JUL 1999 UGA 8:28.91
7. Albert CHEMUTAI 25 NOV 1999 UGA 8:31.21
8. Víctor RUIZ 24 JUN 1993 ESP 8:31.49
9. Martin GRAU 26 MAR 1992 GER 8:34.25
10. Damián VÍCH 14 AUG 1998 CZE 8:46.09
Yohanes CHIAPPINELLI 18 AUG 1997 ITA DNF
Abdelaziz MERZOUGUI 30 AUG 1991 ESP DNF

Men’s 100: Fred Kerley turns the tables on the 100m specialists

This race featured the reigning Olympic/World Championships silver and bronze medalists in Justin Gatlin and Andre De Grasse. Yet it was American Fred Kerley — better known as a 400m man prior to this year — who won, and in convincing fashion, running 9.96 (+1.4 m/s) to handily defeat Gatlin (10.08) and De Grasse (10.17).

Both Gatlin and Kerley started well, and midway through the race had separated from the field. But Gatlin could not match Kerley’s top speed as Kerley pulled ahead and Gatlin could never reel him in

Kerley is in supreme form as there aren’t that many guys in the world who can consistently go sub-10 and Kerley has now done it two races in a row, as a 400 guy. He also  ran 9.91 (#2 in the world, +2.0 m/s) in April in Miami. 

Resutls
Men’s 100m
Final 1, Wind: +1.4
1. Fred KERLEY 07 MAY 1995 USA 9.96
2. Justin GATLIN 10 FEB 1982 USA 10.08
3. André DE GRASSE 10 NOV 1994 CAN 10.17
4. Silvan WICKI 13 FEB 1995 SUI 10.28
5. Ján VOLKO 02 NOV 1996 SVK 10.31
6. Jan VELEBA 06 DEC 1986 CZE 10.38
7. Joris VAN GOOL 04 APR 1998 NED 10.39
8. Zdeněk STROMŠÍK 25 NOV 1994 CZE 10.44

Quick Take: Which event will Fred Kerley run at the Olympic Trials?

At the start of this year, this would not have even been a question. Kerley is the reigning US champ and Worlds bronze medalist in the 400, with a 43.64 pb. Meanwhile, he had run just one 100 since 2015, and his pb stood at 10.49.

Yet Kerley has come out firing at the shorter distance in 2021. Including prelims, he ran five pbs in his first six 100 races this year, getting down to 9.91 on April 24. And now he has just destroyed two of the best 100m runners in the world. Whether Kerley runs the 100 or 400 at the US Olympic Trials is now a legitimate question. Winning an Olympic gold in any event is a big deal, but the glamour, riches, and marketing opportunities are the greatest for the men’s 100-meter champion — the most-watched race in the world. Would Kerley pass up the 400 for a shot at the 100m crown?

He will have to decide soon. The 100/400 double isn’t possible at the US Olympic Trials, as the 400 final is at 7:15 p.m. on June 20 and the 100 final is just 37 minutes later.

That being said, we think Kerley will stick with the 400. It’s way more prestigious to win Olympic gold and possibly set a world record in the 400 than it is to get the bronze in the 100. Regardless, behind Trayvon Bromell, the men’s 100 meters is wide open at the moment.

Women’s 200: Richardson continues to dominate

Sha’Carri Richardson’s unbeaten 2021 season remained intact as she sprinted out to the lead in the women’s 200 and was never seriously challenged, running 22.35 into a 1.1 m/s headwind to win comfortably over Nigeria’s Blessing Okagbare (2nd in 22.59). Richardson eased up approaching the line and looked to be keeping something in the tank for Sunday’s 100 meters in Gateshead, where she’ll face reigning world champions Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce and Dina Asher-Smith in the 2021 Diamond League opener.

Converting for wind, her time equals 22.27.

Women’s 200m
Final, Wind: -1.1
1. Sha’Carri RICHARDSON 25 MAR 2000 USA 22.35
2. Blessing OKAGBARE 09 OCT 1988 NGR 22.59
3. Mujinga KAMBUNDJI 17 JUN 1992 SUI 22.85
4. Dafne SCHIPPERS 15 JUN 1992 NED 22.91
5. Alexandra BURGHARDT 28 APR 1994 GER 23.47
6. Lada VONDROVÁ 06 SEP 1999 CZE 23.90
7. Jana SLANINOVÁ 16 JUL 1990 CZE 24.22
8. Viktoria FORSTER 08 APR 2002 SVK 24.34

Men’s 200: Kenny Bednarek goes sub-20 again

Kenny Bednarek was never challenged in this one as he won in 19.93 (-0.6). Fred Kerley, who doubled back just 80 minutes after winning the 100, was second in 20.27, just off his 20.24 pb.

Final, Wind: -0.6
1. Kenneth BEDNAREK 14 OCT 1998 USA 19.93
2. Fred KERLEY 07 MAY 1995 USA 20.27
3. Aaron BROWN 27 MAY 1992 CAN 20.40
4. William REAIS 04 MAY 1999 SUI 20.69
5. Ján VOLKO 02 NOV 1996 SVK 20.77
6. Jan JIRKA 05 OCT 1993 CZE 21.04
7. Jiří POLÁK 22 APR 1998 CZE 21.21
8. Tomáš NĚMEJC 24 FEB 2000 CZE 21.34

Men’s 400: Kirani James improves his sb

2012 Olympic champ and 2016 Olympic silver medallist Kirani James had company entering the final 100 as 2015 NCAA champ Vernon Norwood, who has already run 44.64 this year, was just off his shoulder, but James pulled away over the final half of the homestretch to win in a seasonal best time of 44.76 (previous sb of 44.88). Norwood ended up second in 45.20.

James’s time makes him the 11th-fastest man in the world in 2021. 15 men have broken 45 this year, including 11 Americans. The top 8 men in the world are all from the US.

Results
1. Kirani JAMES 01 SEP 1992 GRN 44.74
2. Vernon NORWOOD 10 APR 1992 USA 45.28
3. Jochem DOBBER 08 JUL 1997 NED 45.30
4. Edoardo SCOTTI 09 MAY 2000 ITA 45.73
5. Liemarvin BONEVACIA 05 APR 1989 NED 46.18
6. Pavel MASLÁK 21 FEB 1991 CZE 46.52
7. Patrik ŠORM 21 NOV 1993 CZE 46.90
8. Jan TESAŘ 26 MAR 1990 CZE 47.12

Women’s 400 hurdles

Brit Jessie Knight got her second personal best in four days, running 54.74 to shave .04 off her pb and win over Ukraine’s Anna Ryzhykova and Olympic silver medalist Sara Slott Petersen of Denmark.z

Results
1. Jessie KNIGHT 15 JUN 1994 GBR 54.74
2. Anna RYZHYKOVA 24 NOV 1989 UKR 55.09
3. Sara Slott PETERSEN 09 APR 1987 DEN 55.76
4. Emma ZAPLETALOVÁ 24 MAR 2000 SVK 55.83
5. Linda OLIVIERI 14 JUL 1998 ITA 56.48
6. Nikoleta JÍCHOVÁ 29 AUG 2000 CZE 58.47
7. Daniela LEDECKÁ 04 NOV 1996 SVK 59.33
Lina NIELSEN 13 MAR 1996 GBR DNF

Field Events

Men’s Pole Vault: Duplantis tops Kendricks

In a battle between world record holder Mondo Duplantis and world champion Sam Kendricks, Duplantis emerged victorious. Trailing Kendricks after a pair of early misses, Duplantis missed his first jump at 5.85 as well and passed to 5.90 as Kendricks cleared 5.85 on his second attempt. Duplantis answered back with a first-jump clearance of 5.90, and when Kendricks missed at 5.90 — and twice at 5.95 — the victory belonged to Mondo.

1. Armand DUPLANTIS 10 NOV 1999 SWE 5.90
2. Sam KENDRICKS 07 SEP 1992 USA 5.85
3. Valentin LAVILLENIE 16 JUL 1991 FRA 5.60
4. Adrian VALLES 16 MAR 1995 ESP 5.50
5. Ethan CORMONT 29 SEP 2000 FRA 5.40
6. Ersu ŞAŞMA 30 SEP 1999 TUR 5.20
6. Matěj ŠČERBA 09 DEC 1998 CZE 5.20
8. Dan BÁRTA 24 FEB 1998 CZE 5.20
9. Jan KUDLIČKA 29 APR 1988 CZE 5.20
Paweł WOJCIECHOWSKI 06 JUN 1989 POL DNS

Men’s Long Jump: Bey wins

France’s Augustin Bey, 25, got over the 8.00 barrier for the first time in 2021 and his 8.03 in round three gave him the win.

1. Augustin BEY 06 JUN 1995 FRA 8.02 -0.3
2. Benjamin GFÖHLER 27 JAN 1994 SUI 7.73 +0.7
3. Radek JUŠKA 08 MAR 1993 CZE 7.62 +0.1
4. Fabian HEINLE 14 MAY 1994 GER 7.60 -0.4
5. Gabriel BITAN 23 JUL 1998 ROU 7.48 +0.1
6. Jakub BYSTROŇ 30 SEP 1999 CZE 7.41 -0.4
7. Šimon NAVRÁTIL 20 JUN 2003 CZE 7.13 0.0
8. Adam Sebastian HELCELET 27 OCT 1991 CZE 7.08 +0.4

Men’s Shot: Filip Mihaljević wins

Croatia’s Filip Mihaljević, the former UVA star, got the win with a 21.58 throw in the third round as Poland’s Michał Haratyk, the former European champ, was second with a 21.30. 

1. Filip MIHALJEVIĆ 31 JUL 1994 CRO 21.58
2. Michał HARATYK 10 APR 1992 POL 21.30
3. Wictor PETERSSON 01 MAY 1998 SWE 20.90
4. Tomáš STANĚK 13 JUN 1991 CZE 20.11
5. Mesud PEZER 27 AUG 1994 BIH 20.01
6. Konrad BUKOWIECKI 17 MAR 1997 POL 19.84
7. Leonardo FABBRI 15 APR 1997 ITA 19.04

Women’s Javelin:  Hussong wins

Germany’s Christin Hussong, the 2018 European champ who came in ranked #3 in the world this year, improved her sb from 66.45 to 66.56 to get the win.

1. Christin HUSSONG 17 MAR 1994 GER 66.56
2. Nikola OGRODNÍKOVÁ 18 AUG 1990 CZE 65.13
3. Sara KOLAK 22 JUN 1995 CRO 60.04
4. Barbora ŠPOTÁKOVÁ 30 JUN 1981 CZE 59.49
5. Victoria HUDSON 28 MAY 1996 AUT 58.06
6. Haruka KITAGUCHI 16 MAR 1998 JPN 57.49
7. Nikol TABAČKOVÁ

Men’s Javelin:  Vetter dominates

2017 world champ Johannes Vetter crushed the competition with a first-round throw of 94.20 — a mark that is more than 20 feet (6.13m) better than anything anyone else in the world has thrown this year. It was the third best throw of Vetter’s career and the #7 toss in world history.

1. Johannes VETTER 26 MAR 1993 GER 94.20
2. Anderson PETERS 21 OCT 1997 GRN 83.39
3. Keshorn WALCOTT 02 APR 1993 TTO 82.75
4. Jakub VADLEJCH 10 OCT 1990 CZE 82.31
5. Vítězslav VESELÝ 27 FEB 1983 CZE 78.52
6. Martin FLORIAN 20 DEC 2001 CZE 73.21
7. Petr FRYDRYCH 13 JAN 1988 CZE 71.14

Men’s Triple Jump: Zango wins as Taylor pulls up lame

World indoor record holder Hugues Fabrice Zango was the only man to surpass 17 meters, getting out to 17.14 on his opening jump and extending his lead with a 17.20 in round 4, a mark that would hold up for the win. 

The bigger news was a potential injury to double Olympic champ Christian Taylor, who pulled up lame midway through his round 5 jump and passed his final attempt. Taylor, who hasn’t jumped farther than 16.52 this year, only jumped 16.36 today. Taylor is only the 5th-best triple jumper in the US so far this year.

1. Hugues Fabrice ZANGO 25 JUN 1993 BUR 17.20 +0.7
2. Max HEß 13 JUL 1996 GER 16.97 +0.4
3. Melvin RAFFIN 09 AUG 1998 FRA 16.71 -0.9
4. Jean-Marc PONTVIANNE 06 AUG 1994 FRA 16.37 -0.5
5. Christian TAYLOR 18 JUN 1990 USA 16.36 -0.7
6. Jiří VONDRÁČEK 09 SEP 1988 CZE 15.89 -0.9
7. Ondřej VODÁK 16 MAR 1998 CZE 15.59 +0.5

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