Galen Rupp Reaction After Running 13:03.35 For Third in Oslo: “There are no short-cuts in distance running.”

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by: LetsRun.com
June 11, 2014

Galen Rupp’s American record bid never materialized, as he ran 13:03.35 to finish third in Oslo on Wednesday. Rupp ran with the leaders for most of the race, but in the final stretch, it was Ethiopia’s Yenew Alamirew and Kenya’s Caleb Ndiku battling for the win, just as they did on May 31 at the Prefontaine Classic. Alamirew got revenge on Ndiku, taking the win in a world-leading time of 13:01.57 (.14 faster than Ndiku ran at Pre), while Ndiku was second in 13:02.15. Rupp was third, with Kenyan Olympic bronze medalist Thomas Longosiwa in fourth in 13:04.68.

Afterwards Rupp spoke to the BBC. Comments below. Much more extensive coverage of the 5000m coming.

500 to go men's 5000

500 to go men’s 5000

On the pace being slower than expected, Rupp said:

“The pace went out definitely a little slower than I would have liked. At this point, where I’m at, a faster pace at the start of the race suits me a little better, but I’ve been saying all year I really want to work on my tactics and this was really good practice for that. I’ve been making a lot of improvements since last year at finishing close to and beating some of (those guys), but obviously I’ve got a little bit more work to do.”

On showing that you don’t have to African to excel at distance running, Rupp said:

“They’re human too. Obviously, they work very hard, are very talented and are very hard to beat but Americans are realizing just how hard you have to work to beat them. There are no short-cuts in distance running.”

On Mo Farah comming back from his marathon for a double at the Commonwealth Games, Rupp said:

“He’s definitely come back really well form the marathon. I’ve been real surprised how well he’s bounced back.”

On the boards: Galen Rupp’s Post Race’s Comments After His 13:03 3rd Place in Oslo
Rupp: “There are no shortcuts in distance running.”

Galen Rupp talks to the BBC's Jonathan Edwards

Galen Rupp talks to the BBC’s Jonathan Edwards