2011 Monaco Track & Field Diamond League Recap

By LetsRun.com
July 22, 2011

*AP Recap of Meet

The 2011 Monaco Diamond League meet lived up to the pre-meet hype, albeit in some unexpected ways at times. In the men's 5,000, after fans got over the shock of seeing both Galen Rupp and Chris Solinsky end up as DNFs, they were treated to a great stretch duel between Mo Farah and Bernard Lagat that resulted in both ending up with national records; in the men's 1,500, Nick Willis looked like a medal winner in Daegu while Silas Kiplagat looked golden; in the women's 1,500, Morgan Uceny ran faster than she ever has before but lost; in the men's 800, David Rudisha got a world leader as Symmonds ran 1:43; and the men's steeple, which we thought would be the most anticlimatic event of the night, ended up being the best, as Brimin Kipruto truly did something special. And Usain Bolt won - but barely.

We recap the mid-d and distance action for you below and include videos of the races. Recaps of mid-d and distance events appear in the order that the events took place. Additional events appear at the end.

 

Men's 1,500: Kiplagat Rules The World
Willis, Kaki And Chepseba Also Impress

After a dominating 3:31.39 win at the Kenyan trials last weekend, there was little doubt that Silas Kiplagat was currently the best 1,500 runner on the planet. Well, now let there be no doubt. Kiplagat's dominating victory transferred well to Europe, as he absolutely destroyed the field over the final 300 to win in a new world-leading time of 3:30.47.

There ended up being a three-way, near-blanket finish for second between Nixon Chepseba, who may or may not be on the Kenyan World Championships team, 800 specialist Abubaker Kaki and a fast-charging Nick Willis.

In the end, Chepseba, who was the winner of the Diamond League 1,500s in Doha and Shanghai in May but only 5th at the Kenyan trials, ended up second in 3:31.74 with Kaki third in 3:31.76 and Willis third in a new New Zealand national record of 3:31.79.

Willis went unnoticed by the commentators throughout the race but he didn't escape our attention. He ran a near-perfect tactical race and a race that would be ideal for sneaking up for a silver or bronze at a major championship.

Up front, with 16 people on the start list, the race started fast as one would expect, with the rabbit going through 400 in 53.90 and 800 in 1:52.72. Willis, however, knew the first lap would be too fast (56 flat is 3:30 pace) and started out 5th-to-last on the first turn. After the first lap, a 58-second 400 pace was settled into up front until 300 remained. Just before 1,200, the Kenyan champ Silas Kiplagat went to the lead (2:50.89 at 1,200) and begin his kick for home. His last 300 of 39.58 was simply sensational - way better than what anyone else in the field had in the tank.

Meanwhile, Willis was rolling up the field. 5th from last on the first turn, 7th with 400 to go and still 7th with 200 to go - and yet with 50 meters to go, it certainly looked as if  he'd end up second, as he was mowing people down people over the last 150. But as Kaki and Chepsaba dug deep against each other, they ended up pushing Willis out wide (Willis ended out in lane 3) and holding him off.

A Fight At A Diamond League Event!
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Post-Race: Following the race, there was something many believe has never been seen before at a major European track meet - a fist fight. French 1,500 national record holder and Mehdi Baala, who finished 9th in the race in 3:33.69 in his outdoor opener, and 2008 Olympic silver medallist in the steeple Mahiedine Mekhissi-Benabbad, who was 11th in 3:35.51, were having words with each other after the race. The television commentator said there is bad blood between the two, as Baala trains with Mekhissi-Benabbad's rival, Bouabdellah Tahri, the French national record holder in the steeple and 2009 bronze medallist at Worlds. Also there was speculation as to whether or not the two bumped during the race.

Regardless, after some talking, Baala pulled a Zinedine Zidane - disgracing himself and the sport by head butting Mekhissi-Benabbad. After that, all hell broke loose as Mekhissi-Benabbad threw four punches at Baala (none connected). Crazy, crazy stuff.

Reuters has a nice recap of the incident with some quotes from the athletes. Baala reportedly said, "I'm going to break you in two" and "We've just given athletics a bad name and a bad representation of North Africans"

Quick Take #1: Kiplagat looked great and ran a smart race. He wasn't worried about going with the rabbit or having the lead until the last 300 (he was 3rd at the bell). He waited until 300 left to blast everyone.

Quick Take #2: If Willis runs like that, he likely medals in Daegu. Of course it's easier to move up through the field when half of them go out a little too quick. His last lap and last 200 were sensational. We had him at 53.9 for the final 400 with a 26.0 last 200. The only guy better over the last lap was the winner Kiplagat, who ran something like 53.3, but his last 200 was 26-mid compared to Willis, who might have even broken 26-flat.

Quick Take #3: Watching Abubaker Kaki run 3:31.76 in his first serious 1,500 in years (his PR was just 3:39.71), makes us wonder if it might end up being his main event. David Rudisha is so hard to beat at 800, maybe it makes more sense to race at 1,500. Of course, Kaki looked so good maybe he can beat Rudisha at 800.

Quick Take #4: We wonder if Chepsaba's 2nd-place showing will make Athletics Kenya reconsider the decision to yank him from the World Championships team. Originally, despite finishing 5th at the Kenyan trials, he was placed on the team but then yanked off for 3rd placer at the Kenyan Trials, Daniel Kipchirir Komen. Chepseba is having a great 2011. Besides the Kenyan trials, he's run seven 1,500s this year and won six of them and finished 2nd today. Of course, he did get fifth at the Kenyan trials and sixth in the Dream Mile in Bislett.

Quick Take #5: The US and NCAA champion Matt Centrowitz was in the back for most of the race, but he did end up 10th with a modest PR of 3:34.46 (previous best of 3:34.69) thanks to a 56 last lap. 3rd-to-last at 300, dead last (except for the guy who fell) at 700, he moved up to 10th at the bell - very close to Nick Willis - before closing fast - but not faster than anyone else, as he ended up 10th.

Quick Take #6: Deresse Mekkonen's 6th place finish is a bit misleading, as he was the only one that really tried to go with Kiplagat from 300 out. He was a clear 2nd from 300 to 100 remained before struggling on the way home.

Rank Athlete Nation Result
1
KEN
3:30.47
WL
2
KEN
3:31.74
3
SUD
3:31.76
NR
4
NZL
3:31.79
NR
5
KEN
3:32.45
PB
6
ETH
3:32.90
SB
7
AUS
3:33.42
SB
8
FRA
3:33.60
PB
9
FRA
3:33.69
10
USA
3:34.46
PB
11
FRA
3:35.51
12
FRA
3:36.09
PB
13
KEN
3:45.63

14

AUS
3:51.05
 
KEN
DNF
 
USA
DNS

Men's 1,500m Monaco
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Intermediate Times:
400m - Koech, Justus (KEN) - 53.90
800m - Koech, Justus (KEN) - 1:52.72
1,200m - Kiplagat, Silas (KEN) - 2:50.87

 

Men's 800: Rudisha Impresses, Kiprop PRs, And Americans Continue Fine 2011

David Rudisha dominated another 800m in Monaco on Friday night. He became the first man under 1:43 this year, as he ran a world-leading 1:42.61 800m to win by over a half a second over Olympic 1,500 champion Asbel Kiprop.

Rudisha is not back to his 2010 world record form, but is so much better than everyone else in the world right now that in essence his races are anticlimatic. Fortunately, he'll face Abubaker Kaki, the only man people think may be able to challenge Rudisha, in 2 weeks in London.

After Rudisha's personal pacer took the field through 400m in 49.61, Rudisha was soon well clear of the group. On the backstretch, Olympic 1,500m champion Asbel Kiprop made a big move, coming up from 5th position to get into 3rd heading into the final turn. Kiprop would keep moving to the front and would get closer to Rudisha, but was a well-beaten second in a .02 PR of 1:43.15.

Meanwhile the American hopefuls, Khadevis Robinson and Nick Symmonds, were moving up as well. Robinson had been in 7th on the backstretch behind Symmonds but he passed Symmonds on the backstretch and they were still 6th and 7th heading into the final 100m although they have moved up.

Both Americans would blast the final 100m. David Mutua, coming off his 5th place finish at the Kenyan Trials, was in a clear 3rd behind Rudisha and Kiprop and had smooth sailing to the finish. However, for some unknown reason (perhaps fatigue) he started drifting out wide. KD was already on the border of lane 2 and 3 with Symmonds on his shoulder. Mutua forced them into lanes 3 and 4 with KD impacted the most because he got squeezed between Mutua and Symmonds on his outside as all 3 were together near the line. In the end, Symmonds was 3rd in 1:44.83, with Mutai 4th in 1:43.99 and Robinson getting the short end of the stick in 1:44.03.

For Symmonds it matched his second-fastest time ever (1:43.76 PR) and now 3 of his 4 fastest times ever are in Monaco. KD just missed the sub-1:44 barrier thanks to Mutua (Symmonds may have PRed as well if it wasn't for Mutua), but he was rewarded with a season's best.

QT: Both Americans are running very well one month before the Worlds. Rudisha destroyed them, but that is expected. Kiprop doesn't figure in the 800 mix and the only names ahead of Symmonds on the 2011 world list are Rudisha, Kiprop, and Kaki.

1
KEN
1:42.61
WL
2
KEN
1:43.15
PB
3
USA
1:43.83
SB
4
KEN
1:43.99
PB
5
USA
1:44.03
SB
6
KEN
1:44.22
7
KEN
1:44.55
SB
8
FRA
1:46.68
 
MON
DNF
 
KEN
DNF
Intermediate Times:
400m Tangui, Sammy (KEN) 49.61
600m Rudisha, David (KEN) 1:16.19

Men's 800m Monaco
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Men's 5,000: Farah Stays On Top As Lagat Gets American Record
Both Rupp And Solinsky End Up As DNFs

Farah And Lagat Set Records (Final Lap or Highlights of Race)

The men's 5,000 was hyped as the best 5,000 of the year and an American record attempt. Looking at the results, the race lived up to the hype, as coming into the race, only three men had broken 13:00 outdoors in 2011 and seven did so in this race alone, and the American record did fall.

That being said, the majority of the LetsRun.com audience - fans of American distance runers - undoubtedly viewed the race as a big disappointment - a total fiasco in some ways. The race within the race was how the two white American-born hopes in Chris Solinsky and Galen Rupp would stack up against the world's best. Shockingly, we wouldn't find out. First, as the field bunched up and the pace slowed in the last mile as the runners gathered themselves for the kick for home, Galen Rupp fell to the track (photo of Rupp's shoulder after the race here). Then just as US fans got over that shock, with just less than two laps to go, Solinsky was jostled and ended up in the infield at the start of the fourth to last turn. He didn't attempt to try to get back in the race and also ended up a DNF.

Up front, the pace had started hot, as American David Krummenacker took the field through 1,200 (passing the 1,000 in 2:33.50). However, once Krummenacker was gone, the pace would get slower and slower until the last kilomoter, as the second kilometer was run in 2:34.85, the third in 2:38.82, and the fourth in 2:40.16. That's not terribly slow (2:36.00 is 13:00 pace) but the field, which started out single file at the start, would bunch up, resulting in two American casualties that the commentator seemed to blame in part on 2011 World Cross-Country champion Imane Merga. In watching Solinsky drop out of the race on the replay on youtube, it's clear that just before 800 to go Merga did cut in front of Solinsky (although he might have done so because Merga himself tripped up on the person in front of him). Regardless, Solinsky seemingly recovered and then 25 meters later or so, it's not clear what caused him to lose his balance and step over the inside rail and come to a near complete stop next to a bush. Visibly frustrated, he raised his arms in disgust as the runners ran way from him but made no effort to get back in the race. (Update: For a great photo sequence right before the fall, please see the following photo album taken by Jeremy Mosher of Kimbia.net - Solinsky's agency. If that link, doesn't work, try this one. Solinsky definitely got squeezed heading into the turn.)

In the end, though, all of the big African-born players were in it when the race came down to the last lap. Just prior the bell, the man who has been on top of the world so far this year, Britain's Mo Farah, took the lead as six guys were still in contention after a 60-second penultimate 400. Just behind Farah was Bernard Lagat and Thomas Longosiwa, with Lagat being slightly boxed in, as the Kenyan champion Isaiah Koech was in fourth and Merga in fifth. Longosiwa would fade and open things up for Lagat as Farah, who spent the first few laps of the race in the very back of the field, gradually accelerated the pace. With 200 remaining, Lagat was right on Farah's shoulder and Lagat would say glued to his shoulder all the way around the turn. As they hit the homestretch, Lagat moved out to lane two hoping to make his bid for glory, but he never gained an inch on Farah and with 60 meters left, Farah started to pull away.

After a 53.7 last lap (26.4 last 200), Farah was the winner in a new British record of 12:53.11 with Lagat 2nd in 12:53.60 (old AR 12:54.12).

QT #1: We'll never know where Rupp or Solinsky would have finished, but in some ways that might make the World Championships more exciting. To us, distance running is as much about the anticipation of a race rather than the actual race itself. If Rupp and Solinsky had finished this race, we'd have a good idea of how they look. Now we have no idea.

QT #2: We can always guess where they would have finished. It's easiest to guess where Rupp would have ended up using the Transitive Property of Imane Merga.

In Birmingham, in a slower race, Farah closed in 54.2 and beat Merga by 1.49 seconds with Rupp .77 ahead of Merga. Here he closed in 53.7 and beat Merga by 2.3 seconds. But in Birmingham, Farah had it in the bag and let up a bit at the end. In both races, Merga closed in 55-high to 56-flat. So basically, the stats show that in Monaco, both Farah and Merga finished about the same as they did in Birmingham (had Farah gone all out). Thus if Rupp runs a similar race with a similar close then we'd assume he'd beat Merga by a similar amount. Put Rupp ahead of Merga by .77 ad he'd have finished 4th in 12:54.70.

Would he have done that well? That's probably the best case scenario, but it's hard to imagine he wouldn't have broken 13:00.

QT #3: Watching Matt Tegenkamp struggle and run only 13:14 today did make Rupp's 10,000 win at USAs seem less impressive. Running is a tough sport. Tegenkamp ran 13:16 in March and only 13:14 today. Of course, it was an even worse day for Craig Mottram, who ran 13:29.56 today after running 13:11 in Birmingham.

 

Place Athlčte Nationalité Résultat Points Diamond Classement Diamond
1
GBR
12:53.11
WL,MR,NR
8
1
img
2
USA
12:53.60
AR
4
6
 
3
KEN
12:54.18
YB
3
7
 
4
ETH
12:55.47
7
2
 
5
KEN
12:56.08
SB
 
 
 
6
KEN
12:59.01
SB
2
8
 
7
ETH
12:59.25
SB
1
11
 
8
ETH
13:00.46
PB
4
4
 
9
ESP
13:04.73
PB
 
 
 
10
KEN
13:11.29
SB
 
 
 
11
KEN
13:11.73
 
 
 
12
USA
13:14.75
SB
 
 
 
13
KEN
13:15.39
 
 
 
14
ETH
13:26.62
 
 
 
15
AUS
13:29.56
 
 
 
 
USA
DNF
 
 
 
 
UKR
DNF
 
 
 
 
KEN
DNF
 
 
 
 
USA
DNF
2
8
 
 
USA
DNF
 
 
 
Intermediate Times:
1000m - Krummenacker, David (USA) - 2:33.50
2000m - Rono, Vincent (KEN) - 5:08.35
3000m - Yator, Vincent Kipsegechi (KEN) - 7:47.17
4000m - Kipchoge, Eliud (KEN) - 10:27.33


Solinsky Upset After Stepping Off Track

Women's 1,500: Morgan Uceny's Winning Streak Comes To An End

Morgan Uceny's winning streak has come to a halt.

The 2011 US Champion had been on fire, following up her USATF win with 2 dominant Diamond League 1,500m victories.

Friday night, she tried to make it three in a row versus a field that featured 8 of the top 10 in the world in 2011. Coming off the final turn, Uceny was in prime position to extend the streak, as she was in third within striking distance of leader Maryam Jamal.

Tonight, however, was Jamaal's night, as she pulled slightly away down the homestretch to get the win 4:00.59. Ibtissam Lakhouad of Morocco, who ran 3:59 last year, but had not run under 4:08 this year and ran 4:10 in Lausanne, was second as Uceny had to settle for a PR in third in 4:01.51 (previous best was 4:02.40 last year).

This was a 4-person battle the final 200m between the top 3 and Hilali Shiham. Jamal seized the lead just before the turn and pushed hard on the turn to open a gap on Uceny, who closed a bit on Jamal the second half of the turn. If Uceny wants to beat Jamal at her best, she'll have to try to limit her from getting any sort of gap, as Jamal extended her lead slightly the final 100m.

QT #1: Jamal has been very inconsistent in 2011. After opening in 4:01 and 4:00, and getting second at Pre, she ran 4:10 in Lausanne and 4:06 in Birmingham. Today she looked great despite going out hard the first lap. Molly Beckwith took the field out too hard in 60.8 and Jamal was near the front while Uceny was further back. The pace had dropped to 2:07 by 800m, but Jamal was able to withstand the crazy fast first lap.

QT #2: Jenny Simpson was well beaten two seconds back of Uceny in 4:03:54, but it represents a step in the right direction. It's Simpson's second-fastest time ever, and if she continues to improve in the month to Worlds, she should be in good shape. She was ahead of Lisa Dobriskey here, who got a silver at the last Worlds.

QT #3: This wasn't a step in the right direction for Shannon Rowbury (bronze at last Worlds). Many were hoping that after missing much of the early season with injuries she would time her peak perfectly for Worlds.

QT #4: Christin Wurth-Thomas has gone in the wrong direction since her agonizing run at USAs.

1
BRN
4:00.59
9
2
 
2
MAR
4:01.09
SB
2
6
 
3
USA
4:01.51
PB
11
1
img
4
MAR
4:02.75
1
9
 
5
USA
4:03.54
SB
 
 
 
6
KEN
4:04.01
2
6
 
7
ETH
4:04.48
2
6
 
8
GBR
4:04.76
SB
 
 
 
9
USA
4:06.55
 
 
 
10
USA
4:06.63
SB
 
 
 
11
ETH
4:06.69
1
9
 
12
FRA
4:06.74
1
9
 
13
AUS
4:07.62
 
 
 
14
NOR
4:08.01
 
 
 
15
ETH
4:10.30
 
 
 
16
FRA
4:11.53
SB
 
 
 
17
USA
4:12.11
 
 
 
 
USA
DNF
 
 
 
 
ETH
DNF
3
5
 

Uceny Comes Up Short
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Intermediate Times:

400m Beckwith, Molly (USA) 1:00.84
800m Beckwith, Molly (USA) 2:07.65
1,200m Hilali, Siham (MAR) 3:15.60

Men's Steeple: Brimin Kipruto Almost Makes History
Produces A Truly Sensational Performance But Doesn't Lean At The Line And Misses The World Record By .01

Amazingly, the men's steeplechase stole the show in Monaco on Friday night and Brimin Kipruto needs to give Paul Koech a big thank you.

Before the start of the meet, we thought the steeple might be the most anticlimatic event of all, as it came directly after Usain Bolt's race in the 100 meters and just minutes before the post-race fireworks. Clearly the crowd would want to see the event end in a hurry. And end in a hurry it did, as Brimin Kipruto just missed the world record.

Kipruto, the 2008 Olympic champion, was in third place at the bell, but blasted a sub-60 final lap to run 7:53.64, missing the world record by the slimmest margin possible - .01. Kipruto, an incredible championship racer (2008 Olympic gold, 2004 Olympic silver, 2007 Worlds gold, 2005 Worlds bronze), had never broken the 8-minute barrier until Friday, and much of the credit must go to Paul Koech.

Koech, who had gone sub-8 six times prior to Friday, was only 7th at the most recent Kenyan Championships and had petitioned Athletics Kenya to put him on the World Championships team, arguing that he does not run well at altitude (which is true). Koech ran like a man with something to prove, as he wanted to impress the Kenyan selectors. Once the rabbit Haron Lagat dropped out, Koech was more than willing to keep pushing the pace, hoping to secure a sub-8 clocking.

This was a three-man race as Koech led, followed by 2004 Olympic and 2009 world champion Ezekiel Kemboi, with Kipruto in tow. Koech kept hammering away from the front and with 600 to go, it appeared Kipruto might crack off the back as a slight gap formed between him and Kemboi. At the bell, they were single file with Koech still in front. Kemboi struck first on the turn and pulled ahead of Koech with Kipruto then coming around Koech as well. Kemboi and Kipruto would battle on the backstretch until Kipruto took off with about 220 meters to go. Kipruto ran incredibly fast around the bend, hurdling the water barrier, and opened up a huge lead.

Down the homestretch, he was really racing the clock, but it's likely he did not know the world record was in jeopardy. Coming over the final barrier, he glanced over his inside shoulder to see where the rest of the field was. That little glance likely cost him the world record. He powered through the line but did not lean (which also might have cost him) and was rewarded with the #2 time in history. Kemboi was a clear second with a 7:55.76 PR (only his second sub-8 clocking), and Koech's brave frontrunning paid off with a 7:57.32.

Well back, US champ Billy Nelson's fine 2011 continued with a 4-second PR in 8:17.27. Nelson has been resurgent this year since returning to run under college coach Mark Wetmore.

QT #1: Sub-8 clockings are still rare. The 3 on Friday were the 25th, 26th, and 27th sub-8 minute performances ever (by people not convicted of doping). There had only been 1 sub-8 clocking since 2007 until today. More than 1/4th of the all-time sub-8 clockings are from Paul Koech.

QT #2: Kipruto is in excellent form. He was the Kenyan champion.

QT #3: This race showed that to get exceptionally fast times, you often need one athlete willingly or unwillingly to sacrifice themselves as a rabbit. No one was willing to serve that role in the men's 5,000 and the pace lagged. Koech had no choice but to try to run a fast time and it paid off big-time for the front 3.

1
KEN
7:53.64
AR,MR
2
KEN
7:55.76
PB
3
KEN
7:57.32
SB
4
FRA
8:05.72
5
KEN
8:07.41
SB
6
KEN
8:07.75
PB
7
KEN
8:08.22
8
ETH
8:12.10
9
FRA
8:12.25
PB
10
RSA
8:12.27
SB
11
USA
8:17.27
PB
12
FRA
8:17.84
SB
13
USA
8:27.84
14
FRA
8:29.71
15
CAN
8:30.20
 
KEN
DNF
 
KEN
DNF

Kipruto Almost Makes History (Final Lap Or More Of Race)

Intermediate Times:

1,000m Lagat, Haron (KEN) 2:36.55
2,000m Koech, Paul Kipsiele (KEN) 5:15.28

Non-Distance Action (AP Recap Here)
In the non-distance action, Usain Bolt struggled to beat the man who was just 4th at the Jamaican trials, Nesta Carter, as Bolt ended up with a seasonal best of 9.88 in the process. The men's 400 hurdles was viewed as a preview of the World Champs and two-time Olympic champ Angelo Taylor emerged victorious, as US champ Jeshua Anderson really struggled. In the 200m, Allyson Felix ran a seasonal best but lost to fellow American Carmelita Jeter. In the 400, Amantle Montsho won her 4th straight Diamond League 400 in Felix's absence. All of that and much more below.

Additional event results appear below or you can see them even by event if you click here.

Men's 100M

 

Rank Athlete Nation Result Reaction time Diamond Points Diamond Ranking
1
JAM
9.88
SB
0.180
8
2
 
2
JAM
9.90
SB
0.170
4
4
 
3
USA
9.96
0.178
3
5
 
4
JAM
10.01
0.145
3
5
 
5
FRA
10.03
0.152
2
7
 
6
NOR
10.07
0.159
 
 
 
7
POR
10.21
0.155
 
 
 
8
NED
10.24
0.146
 
 
 

 

Bolt Barely Wins
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Men's 400H

Rank Athlete Nation Result Reaction time Diamond Points Diamond Ranking
1
USA
47.97
0.288
5
5
 
2
USA
48.22
0.201
7
4
 
3
GBR
48.43
0.214
12
1
img
4
RSA
48.72
0.271
8
2
 
5
RSA
48.96
0.233
2
6
 
6
USA
49.43
0.341
 
 
 
7
USA
49.48
0.376
 
 
 
8
USA
50.17
0.223
 
 
 

 

Angelo Taylor Wins
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Women's Discus

Rank Athlete Nation Result
Wind
Diamond Points Diamond Ranking   1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.
1
GER
65.90
 
11
1
img
 
65.90
61.88
65.16
x
x
x
2
CUB
65.44
 
SB
10
2
   
64.60
65.44
64.86
61.39
65.01
x
3
USA
62.07
 
5
4
   
x
58.59
59.19
x
61.37
62.07
4
USA
60.71
 
6
3
   
56.45
59.09
60.71
x
58.78
x
5
AUS
60.59
 
3
6
   
59.42
x
59.28
59.59
60.59
58.56
6
ROU
59.60
 
   
59.60
58.10
x
x
x
57.40
7
FRA
58.51
 
   
55.14
55.70
56.97
56.75
57.31
58.51
8
UKR
58.04
 
   
56.07
58.04
57.36
-
x
-

Women's Long Jump

Rank Athlete Nation Result
Wind
Diamond Points Diamond Ranking   1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.
1
USA
6.82
+0.4
15
1
img
 
6.08
(+0.3)
6.81
(0.0)
x
(+0.2)
6.50
(+0.3)
6.70
(+0.4)
6.82
(+0.4)
2
RUS
6.79
-0.2
5
4
   
6.62
(-0.1)
6.75
(-0.2)
6.58
(+0.3)
6.69
(+0.4)
6.79
(-0.2)
x
(+0.2)
3
FRA
6.74
-0.6
2
5
   
6.69
(+0.2)
6.64
(0.0)
x
(-0.1)
x
(-0.2)
6.74
(-0.6)
x
(+0.1)
4
SUI
6.70
+0.2
   
6.70
(+0.2)
5.44
(+0.3)
6.52
(-0.2)
6.49
(-0.2)
5.11
(+0.6)
6.52
(-0.1)
5
SWE
6.65
+0.1
   
x
(+0.5)
6.61
(+0.5)
6.65
(+0.1)
6.59
(-0.1)
6.47
(+0.1)
5.09
(0.0)
6
USA
6.65
-0.1
10
2
   
x
(-0.8)
6.37
(+0.2)
6.45
(-0.4)
6.65
(-0.1)
6.43
(+0.1)
6.57
(+0.4)
7
USA
6.62
-0.3
6
3
   
6.49
(-0.2)
6.62
(-0.3)
6.09
(-0.7)
6.19
(-0.3)
x
(0.0)
6.06
(-0.1)
8
POR
6.48
+0.4
   
x
(+0.5)
6.48
(+0.4)
x
(+0.1)
x
(0.0)
x
(0.0)
x
(-0.3)
 
BAH
NM
 
   
x
(-0.5)
x
(+0.4)
x
(-0.8)
 
 
 

Men's Shot Put

Rank Athlete Nation Result
Wind
Diamond Points Diamond Ranking   1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.
1
USA
21.25
 
MR
7
2
   
19.75
20.70
x
21.25
20.82
x
2
USA
21.23
 
7
2
   
21.23
21.01
20.97
21.01
21.23
x
3
CAN
20.98
 
13
1
img
 
20.61
x
20.84
20.72
20.87
20.98
4
POR
20.39
 
   
19.60
19.81
20.08
x
20.39
20.05
5
USA
19.58
 
   
x
x
19.16
-
x
19.58

Men's Vault

Rank Athlete Nation Result
Diamond Points Diamond Ranking   5.30
5.85
5.45
5.90
5.60
5.95
5.68
6.05
5.75
 
5.80
 
1
FRA
5.90
WL
16
1
img
 
-
o
-
xxo
o
-
-
xxx
xo
 
-
 
2
GER
5.75
10
2
   
-
x-
-
xx
o
 
-
 
xxo
 
-
 
3
GRE
5.60
2
6
   
-
 
o
 
o
 
xxx
 
 
 
 
 
3
FRA
5.60
5
3
   
-
 
-
 
o
 
-
 
xxx
 
 
 
5
FRA
5.60
SB
 
 
   
-
 
xxo
 
xo
 
-
 
xxx
 
 
 
6
USA
5.60
 
 
   
-
 
o
 
xxo
 
-
 
xxx
 
 
 
7
JPN
5.45
 
 
   
-
 
o
 
xxx
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
8
ITA
5.45
 
 
   
-
 
xo
 
xxx
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
8
AUS
5.45
 
 
   
-
 
xo
 
xxx
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
USA
NM
2
6
   
-
 
-
 
xxx
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Women's HJ

Rank Athlete Nation Result
Diamond Points Diamond Ranking   1.80
1.99
1.85
2.01
1.89
2.03
1.92
 
1.95
 
1.97
 
1
CRO
1.97
18
1
img
 
-
-
o
xxx
o
 
-
 
xo
 
xo
 
2
NGR
1.92
2
6
   
-
 
o
 
o
 
xxo
 
-
 
xxx
 
3
FRA
1.89
3
5
   
o
 
xo
 
xo
 
xx-
 
x
 
 
 
4
KAZ
1.89
 
 
   
o
 
o
 
xxo
 
xxx
 
 
 
 
 
5
USA
1.85
 
 
   
o
 
o
 
xxx
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
5
USA
1.85
 
 
   
o
 
o
 
xxx
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
7
SWE
1.85
 
 
   
o
 
xo
 
xxx
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
8
SWE
1.85
5
3
   
-
 
xxo
 
xxx
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
LCA
DNS
2
6
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Women's 400

Rank Athlete Nation Result Reaction time Diamond Points Diamond Ranking
1
BOT
49.71
NR
0.286
20
1
img
2
USA
50.29
PB
0.255
3
3
 
3
JAM
50.61
0.369
3
3
 
4
JAM
50.87
0.311
2
5
 
5
JAM
51.11
0.211
 
 
 
6
CZE
51.38
0.248
2
5
 
7
USA
52.05
0.329
 
 
 
8
FRA
52.73
0.456
 
 
 

Women's Javelin

Rank Athlete Nation Result
Wind
Diamond Points Diamond Ranking   1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.
1
CZE
69.45
 
WL,MR
8
2
   
64.54
64.66
63.18
66.40
64.50
69.45
2
GER
64.86
 
16
1
img
 
59.72
60.66
62.78
64.86
x
64.29
3
LAT
62.06
 
1
5
   
55.93
x
53.46
54.72
61.92
62.06
4
GBR
60.97
 
   
59.82
60.26
60.97
x
57.56
x
5
RSA
59.94
 
2
4
   
59.07
59.75
59.94
57.01
59.21
58.03
6
UKR
59.45
 
   
56.55
59.00
x
x
59.45
x
7
ITA
57.04
 
   
x
x
52.90
54.39
54.23
57.04
8
USA
55.67
 
   
53.59
51.08
55.67
x
x
54.00

Men's TJ

Rank Athlete Nation Result
Wind
Diamond Points Diamond Ranking   1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.
1
GBR
17.36
-0.6
18
1
img
 
17.00
(-0.5)
17.36
(-0.6)
16.90
(+0.5)
17.11
(0.0)
16.76
(+0.2)
x
(0.0)
2
CUB
17.30
-0.4
7
3
   
17.30
(-0.4)
x
(-0.5)
x
(-0.1)
-
17.26
(+0.2)
17.25
(+0.1)
3
CUB
17.29
0.0
SB
2
6
   
17.08
(-0.2)
17.19
(-0.5)
17.29
(0.0)
x
(+0.3)
-
-
4
USA
16.99
-0.4
   
16.76
(-0.4)
16.99
(-0.4)
x
(-0.5)
16.86
(-0.3)
x
(+0.1)
16.96
(-0.1)
5
SWE
16.98
0.0
4
4
   
x
(-0.3)
x
(+0.1)
16.98
(0.0)
x
(+0.2)
-
-
6
FRA
16.97
-0.6
   
x
(-0.4)
16.97
(-0.6)
x
(0.0)
16.92
(+0.2)
-
x
(-0.1)
7
USA
16.74
+0.4
   
x
(-1.1)
16.64
(-0.5)
x
(+0.2)
x
(-0.1)
16.70
(+0.1)
16.74
(+0.4)
8
UKR
16.67
-0.5
   
16.39
(-0.8)
16.67
(-0.5)
16.60
(0.0)
x
(0.0)
x
(-0.1)
16.49
(0.0)
9
FRA
14.62
-0.5
   
14.62
(-0.5)
x
(-1.2)
x
(-0.3)
 
 
 

Women's 200

Rank Athlete Nation Result Reaction time Diamond Points Diamond Ranking
1
USA
22.20
PB
0.175
5
3
 
2
USA
22.32
SB
0.198
6
2
 
3
USA
22.63
0.183
2
7
 
4
USA
22.71
0.193
10
1
img
5
JAM
22.76
0.238
2
7
 
6
USA
22.93
0.193
 
 
 
7
BAH
23.02
0.201
3
6
 
8
FRA
23.37
0.262
 
 

Women's 100H

Rank Athlete Nation Result Reaction time Diamond Points Diamond Ranking
1
AUS
12.51
0.139
12
1
img
2
USA
12.58
0.186
10
3
 
3
GBR
12.60
NR
0.175
3
5
 
4
USA
12.76
0.163
11
2
 
5
USA
12.79
0.271
4
4
 
6
USA
12.98
0.219
 
 
 
7
USA
13.05
0.189
 
 
 
8
FRA
13.07
0.239
 
 


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