2017 adidas Boost Boston Day 1 Recap: Muktar Edris Rips 13:01.04 5K; Charlene Lipsey (1:59.57) Keeps Rolling in 800; Gabe Grunewald Runs Final Race Before Beginning Chemo

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By Jonathan Gault
June 2, 2017

SOMERVILLE, Mass. — Part two of an extravaganza of track & field in the Boston area this weekend took place on Friday night at Dilboy Stadium, highlighted by a sparkling 13:01.04 5,000-meter victory by Ethiopian Muktar Edris. Though the time wasn’t fast enough for a meet record (Dejen Gebremeskel ran 12:59.89 here last year), it was the fastest time by an Ethiopian in 2017, putting Edris in the driver’s seat for one of the four spots to this summer’s World Championships in London (Ethiopia gets four spots as opposed to three as Diamond League champ Hagos Gebrhiwet has a bye).

American Charlene Lipsey won the 800 with another outdoor PR (1:59.57), defeating Sammy Watson, who became just the fourth U.S. high schooler ever to break 2:01 with her 2:00.78 clocking. In the men’s 800, Brandon McBride defeated a stellar field in 1:45.36, gaining a measure of revenge over Donavan Brazier, who beat him out for the NCAA crown a year ago. Boston-based Chris O’Hare took the 1500 in 3:39.31 while his B.A.A. clubmate Emily Lipari doubled back from the 800 at last night’s Adrian Martinez Classic to outkick Dominique Scott in the women’s 1500, 4:12.32 to 4:12.48. Gabe Grunewald was fourth in 4:17.75 in her final race before beginning chemotherapy on Tuesday.

Full recap, results and interviews below.

All results

Men’s 5,000: Edris drops Kenyan Cyrus Rutto late to move to #2 on 2017 world list

This race was all about time for Edris, as he was looking to run fast enough to earn selection for the Ethiopian team at this summer’s World Championships in London. As a result, the pace was fast from the gun and by the time he hit 3k in 7:50.43 (the rabbits took him through 2200), Edris and Kenyan Cyrus Rutto (3rd at the Kenyan Olympic Trials last year, though he did not compete in Rio) were well clear of the rest of the field.

Rutto battled bravely, but Edris’ strength began to show as the race wore on and at the bell he had begun to create some separation. By the time he entered the home stretch, it was Edris vs. the clock and he wound up running 13:01.04 thanks to a 58.41 last lap (4:07.36 last 1600). Rutto held on for second, running an almost 10-second PR of 13:03.44. Surprisingly, no one else was close even though the field contained three Olympic medallists in Dejen GebremeskelEdwin Soi and Thomas Longosiwa.

PLACE ATHLETERESULT20060010001400180022002600300034003800420046005000LN/POS
1Muktar Edris

Ethiopia
13:01.04
30.45
Pl: 4
1:33.67
1:03.23
Pl: 4
2:35.14
1:01.47
Pl: 4
3:37.49
1:02.36
Pl: 3
4:41.19
1:03.70
Pl: 3
5:44.42
1:03.23
Pl: 2
6:47.46
1:03.05
Pl: 1
7:50.43
1:02.98
Pl: 1
8:53.70
1:03.27
Pl: 2
9:57.66
1:03.96
Pl: 1
11:00.76
1:03.11
Pl: 1
12:02.64
1:01.88
Pl: 1
13:01.04
58.41
Pl: 1
4
2Cyrus Rutto

Kenya
13:03.44
31.32
Pl: 9
1:34.31
1:03.00
Pl: 6
2:35.41
1:01.10
Pl: 5
3:37.82
1:02.42
Pl: 4
4:41.44
1:03.62
Pl: 4
5:44.69
1:03.25
Pl: 4
6:47.70
1:03.02
Pl: 2
7:50.65
1:02.96
Pl: 2
8:53.44
1:02.79
Pl: 1
9:57.91
1:04.48
Pl: 2
11:01.04
1:03.13
Pl: 2
12:03.26
1:02.23
Pl: 2
13:03.44
1:00.18
Pl: 2
2
3Dejen Gebremeskel

Ethiopia
13:25.95
30.92
Pl: 6
1:34.87
1:03.96
Pl: 9
2:37.45
1:02.58
Pl: 10
3:41.32
1:03.87
Pl: 9
4:46.94
1:05.63
Pl: 9
5:53.70
1:06.76
Pl: 9
7:00.48
1:06.78
Pl: 7
8:06.39
1:05.92
Pl: 7
9:12.09
1:05.71
Pl: 6
10:17.44
1:05.35
Pl: 6
11:22.19
1:04.76
Pl: 6
12:27.16
1:04.97
Pl: 3
13:25.95
58.80
Pl: 3
8
4Sam McEntee

Australia
13:27.56
31.04
Pl: 7
1:35.08
1:04.05
Pl: 10
2:36.77
1:01.69
Pl: 8
3:39.57
1:02.80
Pl: 8
4:42.68
1:03.11
Pl: 8
5:46.19
1:03.52
Pl: 8
6:52.05
1:05.87
Pl: 5
7:57.84
1:05.79
Pl: 4
9:04.82
1:06.98
Pl: 4
10:12.14
1:07.33
Pl: 4
11:19.47
1:07.33
Pl: 4
12:27.53
1:08.07
Pl: 5
13:27.56
1:00.03
Pl: 4
1
5Edwin Soi

Kenya
13:28.24
31.08
Pl: 8
1:34.11
1:03.03
Pl: 5
2:36.97
1:02.87
Pl: 9
3:39.29
1:02.32
Pl: 7
4:42.29
1:03.00
Pl: 7
5:45.69
1:03.41
Pl: 5
6:51.66
1:05.97
Pl: 3
7:57.95
1:06.30
Pl: 5
9:04.90
1:06.95
Pl: 5
10:11.93
1:07.03
Pl: 3
11:19.64
1:07.72
Pl: 5
12:27.57
1:07.93
Pl: 6
13:28.24
1:00.68
Pl: 5
7
6Alfred Barkach

Kenya
13:29.00
30.68
Pl: 5
1:34.36
1:03.68
Pl: 7
2:36.16
1:01.81
Pl: 7
3:38.43
1:02.28
Pl: 6
4:42.04
1:03.61
Pl: 6
5:46.02
1:03.98
Pl: 7
6:51.91
1:05.89
Pl: 4
7:57.73
1:05.82
Pl: 3
9:04.69
1:06.97
Pl: 3
10:12.24
1:07.56
Pl: 5
11:19.32
1:07.08
Pl: 3
12:27.33
1:08.01
Pl: 4
13:29.00
1:01.68
Pl: 6
3
7Thomas Longosiwa

Kenya
14:06.18
31.51
Pl: 10
1:34.61
1:03.11
Pl: 8
2:35.76
1:01.15
Pl: 6
3:38.08
1:02.32
Pl: 5
4:41.68
1:03.61
Pl: 5
5:45.85
1:04.17
Pl: 6
6:52.36
1:06.51
Pl: 6
8:04.61
1:12.26
Pl: 6
9:17.23
1:12.62
Pl: 7
10:30.90
1:13.68
Pl: 7
11:43.59
1:12.70
Pl: 7
12:54.91
1:11.32
Pl: 7
14:06.18
1:11.27
Pl: 7
6
DNFSteven Sambu

Kenya
 
30.17
Pl: 3
1:33.46
1:03.29
Pl: 3
2:34.91
1:01.46
Pl: 3
3:37.21
1:02.30
Pl: 2
4:40.96
1:03.75
Pl: 2
5:44.52
1:03.57
Pl: 3
       9
DNFKemoy Campbell

Jamaica
 
29.89
Pl: 2
1:33.16
1:03.28
Pl: 2
2:34.59
1:01.44
Pl: 2
3:36.87
1:02.29
Pl: 1
4:40.60
1:03.73
Pl: 1
5:44.30
1:03.70
Pl: 1
       10
DNFLou Serafini

United States
 
29.62
Pl: 1
1:32.93
1:03.31
Pl: 1
2:34.38
1:01.46
Pl: 1
          11

Quick Take: Edris may make the Worlds team, but he believes that gold is off the table

Edris wanted to break 13:00 tonight but said that he thought it was a little windy and the track was hard, which may have cost him a second or two. Still, 13:01.04 is the fastest by an Ethiopian this year, and there’s only one more Diamond League 5,000 on the schedule before Worlds (July 6 in Lausanne). We should point out, however, that 13:01.04 would not have put Edris on the team in either 2015 or 2016.

Edris does have a backup plan, however, as he’s running the Ethiopian 10,000 trials in Hengelo next weekend. He won that race two years ago and based on his run tonight, he should be in contention again this year.

Edris has been one of the world’s best at 5,000 in recent years, running a world-leading 12:54 in 2014, winning two Diamond Leagues last year and crossing the line fourth at the Olympics (though he was subsequently DQ’d). But even he recognizes that a world title is going to be very hard to come by in 2017.

“Gold is difficult,” Edris said after the race. “Bronze and silver, I want. Mo Farah is tough.”

Women’s 1500: Emily Lipari bounces back to kick for win as Gabe Grunewald runs final race before beginning chemotherapy

A small field and a slow pace made sure that everyone was in this one with two laps to go, and at the bell (3:10.20), there were still four women with a chance to win: Eleanor Fulton, who was leading the charge despite running a 4:30 mile last night at the Adrian Martinez Classic; Emily Lipari, also bouncing back from Adrian Martinez where she ran 2:03.01 to win the B section of the 800; South African Olympian Dominique Scott; and Gabe Grunewald, continuing her quest for the USATF standard of 4:09.50.

Fulton, Lipari and Scott began to pull away from Grunewald, with Scott taking the lead on the final turn. But the other two women weren’t licked and Lipari, always a big kicker dating to her college days at Villanova, flew down the homestretch and won it late in 4:12.32 to Scott’s 4:12.48. Fulton took third in 4:12.80 as Grunewald could not improve upon her 4:12.29 SB, finishing in 4:17.75.

PLACE ATHLETERESULT30070011001500LN/POS
1Emily Lipari

United States
4:12.32
49.45
Pl: 3
2:01.02
1:11.58
Pl: 3
3:10.53
1:09.51
Pl: 2
4:12.32
1:01.80
Pl: 1
3
2Dominique Scott

South Africa
4:12.48
49.59
Pl: 4
2:01.17
1:11.59
Pl: 4
3:10.68
1:09.51
Pl: 3
4:12.48
1:01.80
Pl: 2
5
3Eleanor Fulton

United States
4:12.80
49.87
Pl: 6
2:01.44
1:11.58
Pl: 6
3:10.20
1:08.76
Pl: 1
4:12.80
1:02.61
Pl: 3
2
4Gabe Grunewald

United States
4:17.75
50.08
Pl: 7
2:01.48
1:11.41
Pl: 7
3:10.91
1:09.43
Pl: 4
4:17.75
1:06.84
Pl: 4
7
5Kalkidan Gezahegne

Bahrain
4:21.16
49.27
Pl: 2
2:00.93
1:11.66
Pl: 2
3:11.49
1:10.57
Pl: 6
4:21.16
1:09.67
Pl: 5
6
DNFKate Van Buskirk

Canada
 
49.73
Pl: 5
2:01.27
1:11.55
Pl: 5
3:11.00
1:09.73
Pl: 5
 4
DNFAlena Brooks

Trinidad and Tobago
 
48.94
Pl: 1
1:59.77
1:10.83
Pl: 1
  8
DNSLianne Farber

United States
     1

Quick Take: Gabe Grunewald says that this has been “probably the hardest two months of my life”

Grunewald spent the month of May chasing the USATF Outdoor Championship standard of 4:09.50 while battling adenoid cystic carcinoma — her fourth bout with cancer since 2009. Tonight was her last attempt to hit it before beginning chemotherapy on Tuesday, and Grunewald said afterward that it has been extremely challenging traveling the country in search of fast times while having to deal with the immense mental strain of fighting cancer.

“I’m fit but it’s been mentally tough for me to stay focused on racing,” Grunewald said. “…Just my mind is in a bit of a different place. I’m trying to get the most out of myself but it’s just, it’s been tough. Honestly, I’m glad I tried, but it’s been tough, tougher than expected…Probably the hardest two months of my life in the hardest year of my life.”

Grunewald has not run the 4:09.50 auto standard, but she could still make it to USAs as USATF takes the top 30 women by time and Grunewald’s 4:12.29 SB is 23rd on the 2017 U.S. list. That time doesn’t include mile conversions, but it does include a few women such as Brenda Martinez and Kim Conley, who won’t be running the 1500 at USAs.

Now Grunewald will return to Minnesota to begin chemotherapy next week — her first round will wrap up just before USAs. Grunewald said that she’s in uncharted territory now as she’s never undergone chemotherapy before and won’t know how it will affect her body until she does. But one thing is certain: if she’s accepted into the meet, Grunewald will be on the start line in Sacramento at the end of the month.

“Honestly I just gotta hope for the best with my health and I’ll be focusing on that now. Hoping to make USAs. And I will go if I make it, I will. I’ll come and I’ll show up and I’ll see what I can do, but that will be the end, that’s the last thing I’m gonna really try to do [this year].”

Men’s 800: Former NCAA champ Brandon McBride runs down Donavan Brazier in home stretch to get the win

Along with last year’s Olympic Trials final, this had to have been one of the fastest races in recent memory to have used a waterfall start, with three 1:43 guys in the field. The nine-man field (plus rabbit Sadiki White) navigated the early traffic fairly well, but NCAA champ Donavan Brazier, who broke best behind White, elected not to follow him closely and he hit 400 in 52.18, over a second and a half back of White.

Brazier held the lead until the final turn, at which point McBride began to battle him for the lead, and coming down the homestretch McBride continued to push, eventually running away with it to win in 1:45.36, a great time considering the slow early pace. Brazier faded but still hung on for third in 1:46.01 as Olympic finalist Marcin Lewandowski of Poland ran him down for second in 1:45.76. 2016 Olympian Robby Andrews — like McBride and Brazier, a former NCAA 800 champ — was never a serious factor and took sixth in 1:47.47.

PLACE ATHLETERESULT400800LN/POS
1Brandon McBride

Canada
1:45.36
52.44
Pl: 4
1:45.36
52.92
Pl: 1
8
2Marcin Lewandowski

Poland
1:45.76
53.51
Pl: 10
1:45.76
52.25
Pl: 2
6
3Donavan Brazier

United States
1:46.01
52.18
Pl: 2
1:46.01
53.84
Pl: 3
5
4Mark English

Ireland
1:46.06
52.93
Pl: 5
1:46.06
53.14
Pl: 4
4
5Jake Wightman

Great Britain
1:46.07
53.05
Pl: 6
1:46.07
53.02
Pl: 5
9
6Robby Andrews

United States
1:47.47
53.25
Pl: 9
1:47.47
54.23
Pl: 6
3
7Sam Ellison

United States
1:48.80
53.21
Pl: 8
1:48.80
55.59
Pl: 7
7
8Willy Tarbei

Kenya
1:49.38
52.20
Pl: 3
1:49.38
57.19
Pl: 8
1
9Christian Harrison

United States
1:50.02
53.12
Pl: 7
1:50.02
56.90
Pl: 9
2
DNFSadiki White

United States
 
50.57
Pl: 1
 10

Quick Take #1: Brandon McBride says his goal is to make the final at Worlds this year

McBride, who ran 1:43 last summer, is back in Canada, training in Windsor, Ontario, after four years at Mississippi State. Tonight’s run was an impressive win over a quality field, much better than his 1:46.40 opener in Shanghai on May 13. McBride, who went out in the semis in Rio last year, will run on the Diamond League circuit again next week in Rome, and he’s hoping for another season’s best there as he begins to prepare for Worlds. His goal in London?

“I want to make the final, and once you make the final, anything can happen, right?”

Quick Take #2: Donavan Brazier is feeling fresher than he did at this time last year: “I feel like I should make the team, with my ranking right now”

Brazier took a month off from racing to ensure that he’s fresh for USAs, and though he was hoping to get the win tonight, he was pleased with his time.

“I feel like I’m ready to go,” Brazier said. “I’m not gonna be exhausted at USAs this year.”

Brazier admitted that it wasn’t fatigue that caused him to be eliminated in the prelims at the Olympic Trials last year (for a detailed explanation, read this piece) but is feeling confident that he’ll be able to make the team to London this time around.

“I feel like I should make the team, with my ranking right now,” Brazier said.

Quick Take #3: Robby Andrews still has some work to do between now and USAs

Andrews wasn’t happy with how he raced tonight and acknowledged he will need to work hard between now and USAs if he is to make his third straight U.S. team. Andrews had only raced once this spring prior to tonight, a 3:38.42 1500 at Swarthmore on May 17, and though the time wasn’t bad, Andrews was only sixth in the race and not close to winning. He revealed that heading into that race he had been battling a calf injury, which meant that he could do little to no speed work, but that has cleared up and Andrews says he’s feeling 100% now.

Andrews is a big talent with a big kick and has shown the last two years that he knows how to race his best when it counts the most. As for USAs, Andrews is excited.

“It’s gonna be a gun fight, you know? Make sure you don’t bring a knife.”

Women’s 800: Charlene Lipsey keeps rolling as Sammy Watson becomes fourth U.S. high schooler ever under 2:01

This one played out in fairly similar fashion to Lipsey’s win in the B heat at last week’s Prefontaine Classic as she pulled away easily late in the race to win by over a second in 1:59.57. Lipsey was only fifth at the bell (58.84 for her, 58.61 for leader Natoya Goule, Lipsey’s old collegiate teammate at LSU) and there was plenty of action on the last lap. Goule and Olympic finalist Lynsey Sharp battled for the lead on the first turn, with Sharp assuming control on the backstretch, but her lead was short-lived as Ethiopia’s Habitam Alemu, 4th at Pre last week, moved into first with 200 to go. Alemu couldn’t separate however, and Lipsey took over entering the home straight, at which point she destroyed the field to win comfortably. High schooler Sammy Watson, who was way back in seventh at the bell, closed extremely well for second in 2:00.78.

PLACE ATHLETERESULT400800LN/POS
1Charlene Lipsey

United States
1:59.57
58.84
Pl: 5
1:59.57
1:00.73
Pl: 1
5
2Samantha Watson

United States
2:00.78
59.17
Pl: 7
2:00.78
1:01.62
Pl: 2
8
3Habitam Alemu

Ethiopia
2:00.93
58.80
Pl: 4
2:00.93
1:02.14
Pl: 3
6
4Lynsey Sharp

Great Britain
2:01.13
58.63
Pl: 3
2:01.13
1:02.50
Pl: 4
4
5Angie Petty

New Zealand
2:01.73
59.32
Pl: 9
2:01.73
1:02.41
Pl: 5
3
6Lauren Johnson

United States
2:01.92
58.93
Pl: 6
2:01.92
1:02.99
Pl: 6
2
7Natoya Goule

Jamaica
2:02.06
58.61
Pl: 2
2:02.06
1:03.46
Pl: 7
1
8LaTavia Thomas

United States
2:05.43
59.17
Pl: 8
2:05.43
1:06.26
Pl: 8
7
DNFSparkle McKnight

Trinidad and Tobago
 
58.48
Pl: 1
 9

Quick Take #1: More mileage has made the difference for Charlene Lipsey in 2017

After two convincing victories in successive weeks, Lipsey looks to be peaking perfectly for USAs, where she will try to make her first World Champs team. She ran 1:59 both here and at Pre, but in both races she didn’t really get rolling until the final 100, suggesting that she’s capable of significantly faster (remember, she ran 1:58.64 indoors). That’s a good thing as Lipsey believes 1:59 may not cut it at USAs.

“You have to understand, the United States, we’re stacked in the 800,” Lipsey said. “It might take more than 1:59 to make this World team, so mentally I’m preparing myself for that. I’m just gonna kill training for the next three weeks.”

Lipsey said that she set a time goal indoors but smashed it with that 1:58, so outdoors she has not placed any limits on herself.

“If I’m put in a situation, I don’t know what I’m capable of running,” Lipsey said.

Lipsey has seen a ton of success after switching coaches to Derek Thompson this year, and she believes the biggest difference has been the extra mileage she’s put in, which she expects to pay dividends at USAs.

“I feel like I had [the speed], but I just wasn’t strong enough. I could run a decent one round, but you get me to semis and I blew up like a fish.”

Quick Take #2: Ajee Wilson is back to training after undergoing surgery earlier this spring

Lipsey’s training partner Ajee Wilson has been conspicuously absent this year outdoors after setting the U.S. indoor record for 800 meters in February. Lipsey did not want to go into details but said that Wilson underwent a surgery but is now back to training and may make her debut at a low-key meet before USAs. It’s still undecided as to whether Wilson runs USAs or not, Lipsey said not to discount her.

“If my coach put her out there, she’ll be ready,” Lipsey said. “He’s not gonna put her out there if she’s not.”

Quick Take #3: Sammy Watson just keeps getting better

Watson, a senior at Rush-Henrietta Senior High School in New York, moved to #4 on the all-time high school list after running 2:01.47 against the pros last week at Pre and ran even faster tonight, joining Mary CainKim Gallagher and Ajee Wilson as the only U.S. high schoolers to break 2:01 for 800 meters.

Perhaps even more impressive is that Watson beat several accomplished professionals. Lynsey Sharp was an Olympic finalist last year, while Habitam Alemu was 4th. Playing the transitive property game can be inexact, but Alemu finished just .09 behind Francine Niyonsaba in that race — the Olympic silver medallist and World Indoor champ.

Watson said that it still surprises her that she’s able to contend with the pros, but it has stopped surprising us. She’s that good. Her next goal is to join Cain as the only high schoolers in the sub-2:00 club, and if she does that Watson said she will definitely run USAs (right now she’s debating between that and U.S. Juniors).

Watson is committed to mid-distance powerhouse Texas A&M next year but was candid in admitting that if she accomplishes her goals this season, she’d have to think about pursuing a professional career immediately.

“Breaking 2:00, I would have to consider it a lot, going professional,” Watson said.

Men’s 1500: Chris O’Hare kicks best to win

This one was super crowded with a lap to go as 13 of the 14 men within the field were bunched within a .81 of a second of one another. In the end, however, it was Brit Chris O’Hare, who trains nearby with the B.A.A., that got the victory, holding off Kenyans Edwin Kiptoo and Charles Simotwo thanks to a 54.89 last lap.

PLACE ATHLETERESULT30070011001500LN/POS
1Chris O’Hare

Great Britain
3:39.31
42.28
Pl: 4
1:43.19
1:00.91
Pl: 6
2:44.42
1:01.24
Pl: 4
3:39.31
54.89
Pl: 1
12
2Edwin Kiptoo

Kenya
3:39.54
41.83
Pl: 3
1:42.58
1:00.75
Pl: 3
2:44.37
1:01.79
Pl: 3
3:39.54
55.18
Pl: 2
15
3Charles Simotwo

Kenya
3:40.13
43.09
Pl: 10
1:43.49
1:00.41
Pl: 10
2:44.96
1:01.48
Pl: 13
3:40.13
55.17
Pl: 3
5
4Patrick Casey

United States
3:40.34
43.52
Pl: 13
1:44.02
1:00.51
Pl: 15
2:44.82
1:00.81
Pl: 12
3:40.34
55.52
Pl: 4
4
5Drew Hunter

United States
3:40.35
43.30
Pl: 11
1:43.75
1:00.45
Pl: 13
2:44.78
1:01.04
Pl: 11
3:40.35
55.58
Pl: 5
11
6Daniel Winn

United States
3:40.46
42.93
Pl: 8
1:43.41
1:00.48
Pl: 9
2:44.61
1:01.20
Pl: 8
3:40.46
55.85
Pl: 6
7
7Mac Fleet

United States
3:40.49
42.64
Pl: 6
1:43.28
1:00.65
Pl: 8
2:44.51
1:01.23
Pl: 6
3:40.49
55.98
Pl: 7
2
8Andrew Bayer

United States
3:40.60
43.66
Pl: 14
1:43.87
1:00.22
Pl: 14
2:44.72
1:00.85
Pl: 10
3:40.60
55.89
Pl: 8
8
9Cristian Soratos

United States
3:41.37
42.76
Pl: 7
1:43.60
1:00.84
Pl: 11
2:44.66
1:01.07
Pl: 9
3:41.37
56.71
Pl: 9
6
10Hamish Carson

New Zealand
3:42.26
43.87
Pl: 15
1:43.23
59.37
Pl: 7
2:44.56
1:01.33
Pl: 7
3:42.26
57.71
Pl: 10
3
11Collins Cheboi

Kenya
3:42.91
42.41
Pl: 5
1:42.98
1:00.57
Pl: 4
2:44.15
1:01.18
Pl: 1
3:42.91
58.76
Pl: 11
13
12Daniel Herrera

Mexico
3:44.30
43.02
Pl: 9
1:43.72
1:00.70
Pl: 12
2:44.43
1:00.72
Pl: 5
3:44.30
59.87
Pl: 12
9
13Nixon Chepseba

Kenya
3:49.06
43.35
Pl: 12
1:43.09
59.74
Pl: 5
2:44.34
1:01.26
Pl: 2
3:49.06
1:04.73
Pl: 13
10
14Guillaume Adam

France
3:49.56
44.11
Pl: 16
1:44.35
1:00.25
Pl: 16
2:45.97
1:01.62
Pl: 14
3:49.56
1:03.60
Pl: 14
1
DNFMitchell Black

United States
 
41.62
Pl: 2
1:42.20
1:00.58
Pl: 2
  14
DNFConnor Reck

United States
 
40.79
Pl: 1
1:41.40
1:00.61
Pl: 1
  16

Quick Take #1: Chris O’Hare is hoping that training smarter helps him stay healthy and make it back to the World Championship final on home soil

O’Hare made the World Championship final the summer after graduating from the University of Tulsa in 2013, but he barely missed out advancing to the final at the 2015 Worlds and 2016 Olympics. Both times, he wasn’t 100%. O’Hare dealt with a hamstring injury in the months leading up to the 2015 Worlds. Then last year, he had a nerve issue in his knee that caused him to miss three of his final six weeks of running before Rio. O’Hare took a long break in the fall and skipped indoors entirely, but now he’s feeling healthy and is focused on training smarter, not harder. In years past, he would always try to hammer the last three reps if he was feeling good, but this year he has made an effort to run within himself to make sure he is recovered for the next hard session.

“That was my goal, was if I wasn’t all-out and busted on the track after then I hadn’t worked hard enough,” O’Hare said. “That’s just a naive and immature way to train and that’s been the main difference for me, being smart.”

With a win tonight and a 3:34 pb at Oxy, O’Hare’s newfound restraint appears to be working.

Women’s 3,000: Buze Diriba outkicks Sheila Chepkirui

In a race similar to the Ethiopia-Kenya battle in the men’s 5,000 later in the meet, Buze Diriba and Sheila Chepkirui dueled over 3,000 meters. Just as in the men’s race, the Ethiopian had the better kick as Diriba edged Chepkirui, 8:45.44 to 8:45.94, thanks to a 63.37 last lap.

PLACE ATHLETERESULT200600100014001800220026003000LN/POS
1Buze Diriba

Ethiopia
8:45.44
38.30
Pl: 1
1:49.10
1:10.81
Pl: 1
3:00.68
1:11.58
Pl: 1
4:11.25
1:10.58
Pl: 2
5:22.39
1:11.14
Pl: 2
6:34.17
1:11.79
Pl: 2
7:42.07
1:07.91
Pl: 2
8:45.44
1:03.37
Pl: 1
4
2Sheila Chepkirui

Kenya
8:45.94
38.42
Pl: 2
1:49.36
1:10.94
Pl: 4
3:00.85
1:11.49
Pl: 2
4:11.03
1:10.19
Pl: 1
5:22.15
1:11.13
Pl: 1
6:33.92
1:11.78
Pl: 1
7:41.85
1:07.93
Pl: 1
8:45.94
1:04.09
Pl: 2
5
3Gotytom Gebreslase

Ethiopia
8:58.88
38.53
Pl: 3
1:49.14
1:10.62
Pl: 2
3:00.92
1:11.78
Pl: 3
4:11.48
1:10.56
Pl: 4
5:22.59
1:11.12
Pl: 3
6:34.37
1:11.79
Pl: 3
7:45.77
1:11.40
Pl: 3
8:58.88
1:13.12
Pl: 3
2
4Mirriam Cherop

Kenya
9:01.43
38.65
Pl: 4
1:49.31
1:10.67
Pl: 3
3:01.03
1:11.72
Pl: 4
4:11.33
1:10.31
Pl: 3
5:22.99
1:11.66
Pl: 4
6:36.62
1:13.64
Pl: 4
7:50.21
1:13.60
Pl: 4
9:01.43
1:11.23
Pl: 4
3
5Sara Pagano

United States
9:04.53
38.87
Pl: 6
1:49.79
1:10.93
Pl: 6
3:01.54
1:11.75
Pl: 6
4:12.16
1:10.62
Pl: 6
5:24.86
1:12.71
Pl: 6
6:38.92
1:14.06
Pl: 6
7:52.93
1:14.01
Pl: 5
9:04.53
1:11.60
Pl: 5
1
6Leah O’Connor

United States
9:25.86
38.70
Pl: 5
1:49.52
1:10.82
Pl: 5
3:01.20
1:11.69
Pl: 5
4:11.85
1:10.65
Pl: 5
5:23.74
1:11.89
Pl: 5
6:38.18
1:14.44
Pl: 5
7:59.35
1:21.18
Pl: 6
9:25.86
1:26.52
Pl: 6
6

adidas Boys’ Dream Mile

Though there was no sub-4:00 clocking (an exceedingly rare feat in a high-school-only race), there was a great battle to the finish line in the boys’ Dream Mile. Two-time NXN champ Casey Clinger got out hard behind the rabbit, but there would be several lead changes after the halfway point (the field passed 809 meters in 2:04.62, scuttling any sub-4:00 dreams). Kyler True of Kansas was the first to move, taking the lead at 1k, but there were 5 guys still with him at the bell. Austin Hindman of Missouri was the next to go with 200 meters remaining, and he was followed by Patrick Parker of Utah. Parker kicked last and kicked best, seizing the lead with 50 meters to go to win in a PR of 4:03.99 (his previous best was 4:06.72 from this meet last year).

PLACE ATHLETERESULT40980912091609LN/POS
1Patrick Parker

United States
4:03.99
1:02.90
Pl: 3
2:04.74
1:01.85
Pl: 3
3:05.07
1:00.33
Pl: 5
4:03.99
58.92
Pl: 1
2
2Austin Hindman

United States
4:04.53
1:03.12
Pl: 5
2:04.98
1:01.87
Pl: 5
3:05.00
1:00.02
Pl: 3
4:04.53
59.54
Pl: 2
4
3Casey Clinger

United States
4:04.87
1:02.72
Pl: 2
2:04.62
1:01.90
Pl: 2
3:05.04
1:00.43
Pl: 4
4:04.87
59.83
Pl: 3
10
4Isaac Green

United States
4:05.23
1:03.23
Pl: 6
2:05.45
1:02.22
Pl: 8
3:06.16
1:00.72
Pl: 6
4:05.23
59.07
Pl: 4
6
5Mckay Johns

United States
4:06.18
1:02.94
Pl: 4
2:04.79
1:01.85
Pl: 4
3:04.91
1:00.12
Pl: 2
4:06.18
1:01.28
Pl: 5
7
6Yared Nuguse

United States
4:07.28
1:03.83
Pl: 11
2:05.85
1:02.02
Pl: 11
3:06.48
1:00.64
Pl: 7
4:07.28
1:00.80
Pl: 6
8
7Connor Lane

United States
4:10.34
1:03.41
Pl: 7
2:05.22
1:01.81
Pl: 7
3:06.55
1:01.34
Pl: 8
4:10.34
1:03.79
Pl: 7
3
8Kyler True

United States
4:10.72
1:03.47
Pl: 8
2:05.46
1:01.99
Pl: 9
3:04.86
59.41
Pl: 1
4:10.72
1:05.86
Pl: 8
1
9Dalton Hengst

United States
4:16.00
1:03.67
Pl: 10
2:05.20
1:01.53
Pl: 6
3:07.24
1:02.05
Pl: 9
4:16.00
1:08.76
Pl: 9
5
10Hayden Penrod

United States
4:17.39
1:03.63
Pl: 9
2:05.70
1:02.08
Pl: 10
3:07.81
1:02.11
Pl: 10
4:17.39
1:09.59
Pl: 10
9
DNFChristopher Conrad

United States
 
1:02.50
Pl: 1
2:04.48
1:01.99
Pl: 1
  11

Quick Take: American Fork High School took spots 1, 3 and 5 in this race

Anyone who follows the high school scene knows that American Fork (Utah) High School is a perennial powerhouse, but the 2017 edition may have the best corps of milers in prep history. Parker, Clinger and fifth placer McKay Johns all finished in the top five tonight, running 4:03.99, 4:04.87 and 4:06.18. Has any high school team ever had three sub-4:07 milers?

By the way, American Fork didn’t win NXN this year. They finished second to Bozeman, Montana, even though Parker, Clinger and Johns all finished in the top 20.

adidas Girls’ Dream Mile: Freshman Lexy Halladay wins it in 4:41

This one was even more dramatic than the boys’ race as freshman Lexy Halladay of Idaho prevailed in a three-way kick over NXN champ Brie Oakley and Lauren Gregory to win in 4:41.80 thanks to a 66.02 last lap. That’s right: a freshman took down the NXN champ. Halladay is certainly one to watch as she ran 4:46 as an eighth grader last year, but as we’ve seen with countless female runners through the years, that kind of success can be hard to sustain.

PLACE ATHLETERESULT40980912091609LN/POS
1Lexy Halladay

United States
4:41.80
1:13.97
Pl: 4
2:24.86
1:10.89
Pl: 3
3:35.78
1:10.93
Pl: 4
4:41.80
1:06.02
Pl: 1
2
2Brie Oakley

United States
4:41.95
1:14.21
Pl: 7
2:25.06
1:10.85
Pl: 5
3:35.71
1:10.66
Pl: 3
4:41.95
1:06.24
Pl: 2
4
3Lauren Gregory

United States
4:42.00
1:14.15
Pl: 5
2:25.02
1:10.88
Pl: 4
3:35.89
1:10.88
Pl: 5
4:42.00
1:06.11
Pl: 3
8
4Cailie Logue

United States
4:42.94
1:13.79
Pl: 2
2:24.73
1:10.94
Pl: 1
3:35.45
1:10.72
Pl: 1
4:42.94
1:07.49
Pl: 4
3
5Allie Schadler

United States
4:43.00
1:14.39
Pl: 9
2:25.48
1:11.09
Pl: 10
3:36.03
1:10.55
Pl: 6
4:43.00
1:06.97
Pl: 5
7
6Anna Gibson

United States
4:43.06
1:14.52
Pl: 10
2:25.22
1:10.71
Pl: 6
3:36.55
1:11.33
Pl: 9
4:43.06
1:06.52
Pl: 6
1
7Leya Salis

United States
4:45.16
1:13.75
Pl: 1
2:24.82
1:11.08
Pl: 2
3:36.42
1:11.60
Pl: 8
4:45.16
1:08.75
Pl: 7
11
8Brogan MacDougall

Canada
4:47.16
1:14.34
Pl: 8
2:25.28
1:10.95
Pl: 8
3:36.15
1:10.88
Pl: 7
4:47.16
1:11.01
Pl: 8
10
9Taylor Roe

United States
4:52.68
1:14.59
Pl: 11
2:25.69
1:11.10
Pl: 11
3:38.72
1:13.04
Pl: 10
4:52.68
1:13.97
Pl: 9
5
10Julia Heymach

United States
4:53.62
1:13.95
Pl: 3
2:25.30
1:11.35
Pl: 9
3:38.75
1:13.46
Pl: 11
4:53.62
1:14.88
Pl: 10
6
11Joy Ripslinger

United States
4:54.00
1:14.17
Pl: 6
2:25.25
1:11.09
Pl: 7
3:35.65
1:10.40
Pl: 2
4:54.00
1:18.36
Pl: 11
9

Lexy Halladay interview

Men’s 400 hurdles: Michael Stigler gets the win in 48.69

Stigler, the 2015 NCAA champ at Kansas, narrowly missed Byron Robinson’s U.S.-leading mark of 48.58, clocking 48.68, his fastest time as a professional.

PLACE ATHLETERESULTLN/POS
1Michael Stigler

United States
48.696
2Michael Tinsley

United States
49.283
3Roxroy Cato

Jamaica
49.418
4Quincy Downing

United States
49.447
5Jeshua Anderson

United States
49.882
6Jaheel Hyde

Jamaica
50.314
7Jeffrey Gibson

Bahamas
51.065

Women’s 400: Novlene Williams-Mills holds off Courtney Okolo

The 35-year-old Williams-Mills, who was part of Jamaica’s Olympic silver-medal-winning 4×400 relay last year, turned the tables on Okolo — who was part of the gold-medal U.S. squad — holding her off for the win despite being 12 years Okolo’s senior. The winning time, 51.69, was not particularly quick — Williams-Mills ran a full second faster in Kingston two weeks ago.

PLACE ATHLETERESULTLN/POS
1Novlene Williams-Mills

Jamaica
51.695
2Courtney Okolo

United States
51.934
3Taylor Washington

United States
52.288
4Carly Muscaro

United States
52.331
5Anastasia Le-Roy

Jamaica
52.622
6Jessica Beard

United States
53.447
7Laviai Nielsen

Great Britain
53.773
8Christine Ohuruogu

Great Britain
53.956

Men’s 400: Machel Cedenio takes it in 45.65

Josephus Lyles, younger brother of Noah, led after 300 meters but ran out of steam in the homestretch as Cedenio, 4th at the Olympics for Trinidad & Tobago last year, ran him down to take the win in 45.65.

PLACE ATHLETERESULTLN/POS
1Machel Cedenio

Trinidad and Tobago
45.656
2Tony McQuay

United States
45.915
3Josephus Lyles

United States
46.437
4Renny Quow

Trinidad and Tobago
46.798
5David Verburg

United States
46.984
6Kyle Clemons

United States
47.163
7Brian Herron

United States
47.612

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