Day 7 Recap: Dafne Schippers & Ashton Eaton Set the Track on Fire; Tianna Bartoletta Wins LJ Gold with PB on Final Attempt

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By LetsRun.com
August 28, 2015

BEIJING — Night seven of the 2015 IAAF World Championships was a great day for sprinting as fans in the Bird’s Nest were treated to one of the greatest women’s 200s in history and a ridiculous 45.00 400 by Ashton Eaton, the fastest-ever in a decathlon. There was also a dramatic gold for the U.S.’s Tianna Bartoletta in the women’s long jump, and a bronze medal for Aries Merritt in the 110 hurdles four days before he’s due to have a kidney transplant. We recap it all below.

We also have longer recaps of the brutal men’s 1500 semis and Merritt’s incredible bronze medal.

Women’s 200: Dafne Schippers Wins Gold in 21.63 to Become the Third-Fastest Woman of All Time

The women’s 200 was viewed as one of the weaker events in Beijing as the two women many considered to be the best in the world, Allyson Felix and Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce, opted not to run the half-lap event. Maybe they’re glad they didn’t now considering that if they had run their PRs tonight, they would have finished third (Felix) and sixth (Fraser-Pryce).

It was that close for gold

It was that close for gold

Obviously we can’t make those projections, considering how fast the Bird’s Nest track is (four of the top five women set PRs), so let’s focus on what did happen: the Netherlands’ Dafne Schippers ran the fourth-fastest time ever, 21.63, to win gold ahead of Jamaica’s Elaine Thompson, who ran the sixth-fastest time ever, 21.66, for silver. Two-time Olympic champion Veronica Campbell-Brown of Jamaica took the bronze in 21.97 as three women broke 22.00 in the same race for only the second time in history.

Behind the top three, U.S. runner-up Candyce McGrone (4th, 22.01) and Great Britain’s Dina Asher-Smith (5th, 22.07), both PR’d in times that would have won gold two years ago but couldn’t even get on the medal stand tonight.

POSBIBATHLETECOUNTRYMARKReaction Time
1622 Dafne Schippers NED NED21.63CR0.149
2520 Elaine Thompson JAM JAM21.66PB0.195
3508 Veronica Campbell-Brown JAM JAM21.97SB0.142
4900 Candyce McGrone USA USA22.01PB0.158
5383 Dina Asher-Smith GBR GBR22.07NR0.162
6921 Jeneba Tarmoh USA USA22.310.150
7197 Ivet Lalova-Collio BUL BUL22.410.157
8518 Sherone Simpson JAM JAM22.50SB0.148

Here’s the new all-time performers list at 200 meters:

  1. Florence Griffith-Joyner, 21.34
  2. Marion Jones, 21.62
  3. Dafne Schippers, 21.63
  4. Merlene Ottey, 21.64
  5. Elaine Thompson, 21.66

It looks like Schippers’ decision to switch to sprinting full-time was the right one. She earned a bronze medal in the heptathlon in Moscow but has topped that in both of her events in Beijing, grabbing a silver in the 100 and a gold tonight. Schippers also has the European record now, and it’s nice to see Marita Koch’s name knocked off the top of that list (Koch had the old record at 21.71).

Schippers’ victory is also the first by a white man or woman in the 100 or 200 at Worlds/Olympics since Belarus’ Yulia Nestsiarenka won the 100 at the 2004 Olympics.

19 Year Old Dina Asher-Smith Gets 5th with a PB

Only 19, Asher-Smith broke the British national record with a PB to finish fifth. She was super pleased, “Honestly, I’m really, really happy because I was in that kind of race where I gave it my all and I ran the best race I could ahve right now and it was only good enough for fifth which I can’t help but smile about.”

She was full of praise for the winner, “I can’t emphasize how amazing she is as an athlete.”

Men’s Decathlon: Ashton Eaton Runs 45.00 in the 400 and the World Record Attempt is Very Much On

Through the first four events of the decathlon, 2012 Olympic and 2013 World champ Ashton Eaton already led by 56 points over Canada’s Damian Warner, but he blew the competition wide open by running a decathlon world record of 45.00 in the 400 to close out day one. Eaton now has 4703 points, 173 clear of Warner. 2009/2011 World champ Trey Hardee of the U.S. had to withdraw after three events due to a lower back injury suffered during the long jump.

In the first event of the day, Eaton set a championship decathlon best of 10.23 in the 100 (.02 off his PB) but it was his 400 performance that was the most startling, as he ran 1.83 seconds faster than the next-best athlete and .68 of a second faster than any other athlete in history during a decathlon (the previous decathlon best was Bill Toomey’s 45.68 in the 1968 Olympics).

“I thought the clock was off by a second, I swear,” Eaton told USATF. “I did 400 hurdles last year and that helped, and some 400s against some fast guys this year. The only difference is that they start moving with 200 meters to go. I PB’d a couple of weeks before I got here at 45.5 and I did that technique, so [coach] Harry [Marra] and I have been talking. He said, ‘You’ve just got to trust it, Ash, you’ll run fast.’

“No way in hell did we think I was running that fast. I thought 46-flat, maxed out. But I saw some decathletes in the heats before running some pretty good times, so long story short it is, you know me. I just go and don’t hold too much back. So, I did that with the technique and all, so it turned out something unbelievable.”

Barring a disaster tomorrow, Eaton should win gold and talk will turn to whether he can break the world record he set at the Olympic Trials three years ago. That mark is 9039 points, and he had 4728 after day 1, 25 more than he does today. So even if Eaton has the win sewn up by the 1500 (8:10 a.m. ET), there could still be drama to be had.

POSBIBATHLETECOUNTRYPoints100 MetresLong JumpShot PutHigh Jump400 Metres110 Metres HurdlesDiscus ThrowPole VaultJavelin Throw1500 Metres
1 Ashton Eaton USA USA4703Points
Mark
Wind m/s
1040
10.23
-0.4
1030
7.88
0.0
760
14.52
813
2.01
1060
45.00
2 Damian Warner CAN CAN4530Points
Mark
Wind m/s
1020
10.31
-0.4
972
7.65
+0.2
755
14.44
840
2.04
943
47.30
3 Rico Freimuth GER GER4406Points
Mark
Wind m/s
973
10.51
-0.4
937
7.51
+0.5
820
15.50
758
1.95
918
47.82
4 Kai Kazmirek GER GER4401Points
Mark
Wind m/s
883
10.90
-0.2
910
7.40
+0.2
745
14.27
896
2.10
967
46.83
5 Michael Schrader GER GER4355Points
Mark
Wind m/s
910
10.78
-0.4
987
7.71
+0.1
748
14.32
758
1.95
952
47.12
6 Larbi Bourrada ALG ALG4345Points
Mark
Wind m/s
899
10.83
-0.2
937
7.51
+0.6
712
13.73
868
2.07
929
47.60
7 Felipe dos Santos BRA BRA4344Points
Mark
Wind m/s
968
10.53
-0.4
945
7.54
+0.6
704
13.61
813
2.01
914
47.89
8 Kurt Felix GRN GRN4338Points
Mark
Wind m/s
856
11.02
-0.7
975
7.66
+1.4
791
15.02
896
2.10
820
49.89
9 Ilya Shkurenev RUS RUS4338Points
Mark
Wind m/s
858
11.01
-0.7
935
7.50
+0.5
734
14.09
896
2.10
915
47.88
10 Oleksiy Kasyanov UKR UKR4337Points
Mark
Wind m/s
922
10.73
-0.2
955
7.58
-0.1
744
14.25
813
2.01
903
48.13
11 Eelco Sintnicolaas NED NED4294Points
Mark
Wind m/s
947
10.62
-0.2
935
7.50
+0.4
768
14.65
731
1.92
913
47.93
12 Jeremy Taiwo USA USA4244Points
Mark
Wind m/s
847
11.06
-0.2
850
7.15
+0.3
739
14.18
896
2.10
912
47.94
13 Zach Ziemek USA USA4205Points
Mark
Wind m/s
903
10.81
-0.4
952
7.57
+0.3
690
13.38
840
2.04
820
49.89
14 Adam Sebastian Helcelet CZE CZE4202Points
Mark
Wind m/s
841
11.09
-0.5
883
7.29
+0.6
808
15.30
840
2.04
830
49.66
15 Bastien Auzeil FRA FRA4191Points
Mark
Wind m/s
812
11.22
-0.7
876
7.26
+0.8
813
15.38
813
2.01
877
48.66
16 Pieter Braun NED NED4179Points
Mark
Wind m/s
836
11.11
-0.7
883
7.29
+0.2
722
13.90
840
2.04
898
48.24
17 Yordani García CUB CUB4161Points
Mark
Wind m/s
912
10.77
-0.2
771
6.82
+0.5
761
14.54
840
2.04
877
48.67
18 Maicel Uibo EST EST4136Points
Mark
Wind m/s
806
11.25
-0.5
845
7.13
+0.1
756
14.45
925
2.13
804
50.24
19 Thomas van der Plaetsen BEL BEL4125Points
Mark
Wind m/s
765
11.44
-0.5
915
7.42
+1.2
718
13.83
925
2.13
802
50.28
20 Jorge Ureña ESP ESP4066Points
Mark
Wind m/s
863
10.99
-0.7
886
7.30
+1.0
651
12.74
813
2.01
853
49.17
21 Pawel Wiesiolek POL POL4044Points
Mark
Wind m/s
845
11.07
-0.7
833
7.08
+0.4
698
13.50
785
1.98
883
48.55
22 Akihiko Nakamura JPN JPN4030Points
Mark
Wind m/s
892
10.86
-0.4
876
7.26
+0.5
586
11.67
758
1.95
918
47.81
23 Pau Tonnesen ESP ESP4024Points
Mark
Wind m/s
804
11.26
-0.5
864
7.21
+0.3
712
13.74
840
2.04
804
50.24
24 Niels Pittomvils BEL BEL3781Points
Mark
Wind m/s
776
11.39
-0.5
781
6.86
+0.4
653
12.77
731
1.92
840
49.45
25 Janek Õiglane EST EST3769Points
Mark
Wind m/s
750
11.51
-0.5
762
6.78
0.0
755
14.43
731
1.92
771
50.95
26 Keisuke Ushiro JPN JPN3766Points
Mark
Wind m/s
750
11.51
-0.5
750
6.73
+0.9
785
14.93
705
1.89
776
50.85
Trey Hardee USA USADNFPoints
Mark
Wind m/s
961
10.56
-0.4
886
7.30
+0.1
498
10.20
0
DNS
Luiz Alberto de Araújo BRA BRADNFPoints
Mark
Wind m/s
878
10.92
-0.2
799
6.94
+0.4
780
14.84
0
DNS
Willem Coertzen RSA RSADNFPoints
Mark
Wind m/s
865
10.98
-0.7
874
7.25
+0.3
713
13.75
758
1.95
0
DNS

Women’s Long Jump: Tianna Bartoletta Claims Her Second World Championship with a Clutch 7.14-Meter Personal Best on Her Final Attempt

Ten years after earning gold as a 19-year-old in Helsinki, Tianna Bartoletta is on top of the world again thanks to a huge jump on her final attempt to snatch the win from Great Britain’s Shara Proctor. Proctor got out to 7.07 on her third jump, a British record, and it looked like that would hold up for gold until the final round, when Bartoletta capitalized on a friendly 1.4 m/s tailwind to leap a world-leading 7.14, a personal best.

“I went for it on the first jump and fouled,” Bartoletta said to USATF. “Then after that, I kind of settled down a little bit and really began to settle into every jump. I just focused on what can I do better, what can I do better. It really didn’t matter that national records are being set, people were jumping seven meters, setting personal bests — I didn’t care. It didn’t make me nervous, it didn’t add pressure. Every jump was like, okay what can you do to make this next jump.”

POSBIBATHLETECOUNTRYMARKWindDETAILAttempt 1Attempt 2Attempt 3Attempt 4Attempt 5Attempt 6
1860Tianna BartolettaUSA USA 7.14 +1.2WLX +1.46.95 +1.36.87 +0.16.62 +1.36.94 +0.67.14 +1.2
2409Shara ProctorGBR GBR 7.07 +0.4NRX +0.26.87 +0.97.07 +0.47.01 +0.6X +1.0X +0.7
3762Ivana ŠpanovicSRB SRB 7.01 +0.8NR7.01 +0.8X +0.8X +0.66.86 +0.96.98 +1.07.01 +0.6
4221Christabel NetteyCAN CAN 6.95 +0.96.95 +0.96.85 +1.0X -0.26.69 +0.86.84 +0.9X +1.3
5414Lorraine UgenGBR GBR 6.85 +0.7X +0.46.85 +0.76.73 +1.0X +0.7X +0.9X +1.2
6436Malaika MihamboGER GER 6.79 +0.3X -0.46.79 +0.3X +0.5X6.60 +0.4
7797Khaddi SagniaSWE SWE 6.78 +1.3PBX +1.36.67 +1.16.56 +0.76.40 -0.76.78 +1.35.05 +0.8
8875Janay DeLoach SoukupUSA USA 6.67 +0.66.67 +0.6X +0.56.64 +1.26.53 +0.5X +0.7X +0.9
9161Nastassia Mironchyk – IvanovaBLR BLR 6.66 +0.66.66 +0.6X +0.56.53 +0.6
10720Darya KlishinaRUS RUS 6.65 +1.26.60 +0.66.65 +1.26.50 +0.6
11401Katarina Johnson-ThompsonGBR GBR 6.63 +0.66.63 +1.4X +0.96.63 +0.6
12791Erica JarderSWE SWE 6.48 +0.4X +0.8X6.48 +0.4

Bartoletta reflected with LRC on her long journey back to the top of the world.

 

She said, “Yeah I wasn’t doing much of anything (in the down years). I was trying to but things were so bad and I was so down and depressed and just not around very good people. My performances were just a reflection of how I felt about myself. I started to find my way back especially after I met my husand and things strated to turn around and I got more positive and more stable and more confident. You saw I made the Olympic tgeam in the 100, that was just the beginning of the confidence growing and growing and growing and every year we are like ‘what can we do now’… you’ll continue to see my develop,” she said.

Bartoletta has come a long way off the track since re-emerging on it in 2012. That year she would not speak to the press, but she was a smiling confident woman on Friday.

The full Bartoletta story has not been told (there were serious allegations against her parents and a lawsuit in 2012), but she is back on top of the track and field world.

Men’s 110 M Hurdles: Sergey Shubenkov Wins as Aries Merritt Earns Bronze Four Days Before He Undergoes a Kidney Transplant

The gold medal in the 110m hurdles went to Sergey Shubenkov of Russia in a personal best of 12.98 as he became the 20th member of the sub-13.00 club and the silver to Jamaica’s Hansle Parchment in 13.03, but the real winner on Friday night was Aries Merritt, who earned the bronze in 13.04 just four days before he undergoes surgery to receive a new kidney from his sister LaToya.

Merritt’s story is so amazing that we gave it its own article, which you can read here.

POSBIBATHLETECOUNTRYMARKReaction Time
1883 Sergey Shubenkov RUS RUS12.98NR0.139
2639 Hansle Parchment JAM JAM13.03SB0.143
31046 Aries Merritt USA USA13.04SB0.141
4507 Pascal Martinot-Lagarde FRA FRA13.170.150
5489 Dimitri Bascou FRA FRA13.170.137
6637 Omar McLeod JAM JAM13.180.135
71051 David Oliver USA USA13.330.157
8492 Garfield Darien FRA FRA13.340.178

Women’s 100 Hurdles: Danielle Williams Wins Gold in a Race Where the Form Charts Meant Nothing

In the hurdles, it’s often the case that one athlete gets hot and steamrolls the competition all year, as Brianna Rollins did to win Worlds in 2013. Nothing like that happened in 2015.

The three medalists in tonight’s final — champion Danielle Williams of Jamaica, runner-up Cindy Roleder of Germany and third-placer Alina Talay of Belarus — entered the championships with the #12, #39 and #11 times this year, respectively. But all three picked the right time to run well (all ran PBs in the final — for Williams and Roleder, it was their second PR of the night after the semis just over two hours earlier).

Roleder’s improvement in Beijing was absurd. Though she ran 12.80 last year, she hadn’t bettered 12.92 in 2015 until her 12.86 in Thursday’s prelim. Then she ran 12.79 in the semis and 12.59 in the final.

In contrast, the event was a massive disappointment for the Americans, who held the top five places on the world list entering the championships and came home without a single medal despite four entrants. World leader Sharika Nelvis struggled out of the blocks and wound up last in the final. U.S. champ Dawn Harper-Nelson went down on hurdle #2 in the semis and didn’t qualify. NCAA champ Kendra Harrison false-started in the semis. Even American-born Brit Tiffany Porter struggled, as she closed horribly off the final hurdle to slip from medal position to fifth place. Rollins was the lone American with a solid performance, but her 12.67 was only good enough for fourth, .01 out of a medal.

It’s quite shocking that in two of the U.S.’s strongest events — the 100 hurdles and the women’s 800 — Team USA will be heading home with zero medals, and in the case of the women’s 800, zero finalists.

POSBIBATHLETECOUNTRYMARKReaction Time
1530 Danielle Williams JAM JAM12.57PB0.142
2443 Cindy Roleder GER GER12.59PB0.145
3164 Alina Talay BLR BLR12.66NR0.146
4914 Brianna Rollins USA USA12.670.148
5408 Tiffany Porter GBR GBR12.680.140
6777 Noemi Zbären SUI SUI12.950.165
7532 Shermaine Williams JAM JAM12.950.177
8905 Sharika Nelvis USA USA13.060.168


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