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canadian runner
Compression Socks... do they work? 5/3/2011 8:47AM Reply | Return to Index | Report Post
I'm looking into buying a pair of CEP compression socks and I'm just curious about people's thoughts on whether compression socks really improve recovery, reduce fatigue, optimize performance, etc.

http://www.cepsocks.com/cep-running-progressive-compression-socks.html

I've had stress fracture problems in my lower tibias as well and experience a lot of soreness in that area still. Do you think compression socks would help?
i think so
RE: Compression Socks... do they work? 5/3/2011 9:14AM - in reply to canadian runner Reply | Return to Index | Report Post
I have been using these post run (in the evening) and I feel they have helped me.

http://www.roadrunnersports.com/rrs/products/ZNM100/cmproductcrosssell/

I can't speak to the stress factures. But, they have helped me eliminate a lot of stiffness in my calves over the last six months or so. I have not run in them and probably won't. I have been pleasantly surprised by how they have helped what had been a chronic problem building up over the past couple of years.
wow...
RE: Compression Socks... do they work? 5/3/2011 10:26AM - in reply to i think so Reply | Return to Index | Report Post
Swiftwick. Get Swiftwick instead, better sock overall, better quality, quite a bit cheaper.

Ran a marathon last spring in them and everything else cramped, hammies, quads, etc.

My calves felt golden. Seriously they didn't feel like I had run at all.
txRUNNERgirl
RE: Compression Socks... do they work? 5/3/2011 10:35AM - in reply to canadian runner Reply | Return to Index | Report Post
I never had calf problems, but have always had shin pain, tibial stress reactions and fractures. I finally gave in to trying compression sleeves last November and ever since, I've had no shin pain. It felt like a miracle. I even made it through training and racing my first marathon without any issues. For several years after I quit competing in college (because of tibial injuries), I could never string together any consistent training. Now I can.
Old Man Runner
RE: Compression Socks... do they work? 5/3/2011 10:46AM - in reply to txRUNNERgirl Reply | Return to Index | Report Post
TxRunnerGirl...How is the recovery going?
Yes
RE: Compression Socks... do they work? 5/3/2011 10:48AM - in reply to wow... Reply | Return to Index | Report Post

wow... wrote:

Swiftwick. Get Swiftwick instead, better sock overall, better quality, quite a bit cheaper.

Ran a marathon last spring in them and everything else cramped, hammies, quads, etc.

My calves felt golden. Seriously they didn't feel like I had run at all.


Naw, CEP >>>
txRUNNERgirl
RE: Compression Socks... do they work? 5/3/2011 11:33AM - in reply to Old Man Runner Reply | Return to Index | Report Post

Old Man Runner wrote:

TxRunnerGirl...How is the recovery going?


Still sore, but not bad. I'm taking this week off and will do some short, easy runs next week. Then I plan to focus on shorter distance training and racing over the summer and will switch back to marathon mode to train for Houston.
sock doubter
RE: Compression Socks... do they work? 5/3/2011 12:27PM - in reply to canadian runner Reply | Return to Index | Report Post
It depends on whether you BELIEVE they will work for you:
http://sweatscience.com/whole-body-compression-garments-for-soccer-players/
shinstressandbeyond
RE: Compression Socks... do they work? 5/3/2011 2:39PM - in reply to txRUNNERgirl Reply | Return to Index | Report Post

txRUNNERgirl wrote:

I never had calf problems, but have always had shin pain, tibial stress reactions and fractures. I finally gave in to trying compression sleeves last November and ever since, I've had no shin pain. It felt like a miracle. I even made it through training and racing my first marathon without any issues. For several years after I quit competing in college (because of tibial injuries), I could never string together any consistent training. Now I can.


Almost the exact same situation as me. The socks work wonders.
Please dont dump on or in me
RE: Compression Socks... do they work? 5/3/2011 4:19PM - in reply to canadian runner Reply | Return to Index | Report Post
I only use mine for training, not recovery. I used to regularly get minor calf tears that would put me out for a couple of weeks at a time. Wearing the socks stops this.

Hate wearing them. They are hot and look stupid, but they absolutely help with my calf issues.
slipstreamer
RE: Compression Socks... do they work? 5/3/2011 5:55PM - in reply to Please dont dump on or in me Reply | Return to Index | Report Post
From Ben G.

8. Sperlich, B., M. Haegele, S. Achtzehn, J. Linville, H.C. Holmberg, J. Mester. 2010. Different types of compression clothing do not increase sub-maximal and maximal endurance performance in well-trained athletes. J Sports Sci 28(6):609-14.

Summary: Fifteen young (27 +/- 4.8 years old), well-trained (VO2 max 63.7 +/- 4.9) athletes did sub-maximal (70% VO2 max) and maximal tests wearing either compression stockings, standard tights or whole-body compression suits. There were no differences in performance, ratings of perceived exertion, muscle soreness, time to exhaustion and lactate concentrations.

Does Compression Clothing Improve Recovery?

9. Ali, A., M.P. Caine, B.G. Snow. 2007. Graduated compression stockings: Physiological and perceptual responses during and after exercise. J Sports Sci 25(4):413-419.

Summary: In this study Ali discovered that after 10km running trials, recreationally active men experienced a reduction in delayed-onset muscle soreness 24 hours after wearing compression stockings (18-22 mmHg) compared with traditional sports socks.

10. Berry, M.J., R.G. McMurray. 1987. Effects of graduated compression stockings on blood lactate following an exhaustive bout of exercise. J Phys Med 66(3):121-32.

Summary: Twelve highly fit males were subjects in 2 experiments. In the first experiment 6 of them did VO2 max tests on a treadmill with and without compression stockings. In the second 6 of them did 3 x 3-minute max efforts on a bicycle ergometer at 110% of their VO2 max. On the first of these 3-minute efforts they wore compression stockings during the test and during recovery. For the second 3-minute bout they wore compression stockings during the test but not during the recovery. On the third they did not use compression stockings for either the 3-minute effort or the recovery. For the first experiment (VO2 max tests) there was no difference in VO2 max with or without compression stockings. But blood lactate levels after the test were lower with compression stockings. For the second experiment (3-minute max efforts) post-exercise lactate was lower only when compression stockings were worn during recovery.

11. Davies, V., K.G. Thompson, S.M. Cooper. 2009. The effects of compression garments on recovery. J Strength Cod Res 23(6):1786-94.

Summary: Following exercises designed to cause soreness 11 trained subjects wore compression tights on one occasion and none on another. Self-reported muscle soreness was reduced by wearing the tights.

12. French D.N., K.G. Thompson, S.W. Garland, C.A. Barnes, M.D. Portas, P.E. Hood, G. Wilkes. 2008. The effects of contrast bathing and compression therapy on muscular performance. Med Sci Sports Exerc 40(7):1297-306.

Summary: Twenty-six young men did heavy-load squats to induce muscle soreness. 48 hours afterwards they were evaluated for strength performance. During the 48 hours they either 1) did hot-cold contrast baths, 2) wore compression stockings or 3) rested passively. Neither the contrast baths or compression stockings promoted recovery any more effectively than passive rest. However, the contrast baths had a brief but transient benefit for reduced soreness.

13. Miyamoto, N., K. Hirata, N. Mitsukawa, T. Yanai, Y. Kawkami. 2011. Effect of pressure intensity of graduated elastic compression stocking on muscle fatigue following calf-raise exercise. J Electromyogr Kinsiol 21(2):249-54.

Summary: Fourteen subjects did 15 sets of 10 reps each of calf raises on different occasions. They wore either standard stockings (CON), compression stockings of 21-25 mmHg at the calf and 30 at the ankle (EC30), or compression stockings of 12-14 mmHg at the calf and 18 at the ankle (EC18). The EC30 stockings produced the lowest levels of fatigue.

14. Montgomery, P.G., D.B. Pyne, W.G. Hopkins, J.C. Dorman, K. Cook, C.L. Minhan. 2008. The effect of recovery strategies on physical performance and cumulative fatigue in competitive basketball. J Sports Sci 26(11):1135-45.

Summary: 29 male basketball players competed in a 3-day tournament. After each game they recovered by either 1) taking in extra carbohydrate and stretching, 2) doing cold-water immersion (11C degrees) or 3) wearing full-leg compression garments (18 mmHg for 18 hours). Measures of recovery were sprint speed, agility, vertical jump height and flexibility. Cold-water produced better recovery results than carbs + stretching or the compression garments.

15. Riman, D., L. Messonier, J. Castells, X. Devillard, P. Calmels. 2010. Effects of compression stockings during exercise and recovery on blood lactate kinetics. Eur J Appl Physiol 110(2):425-33.

Summary: Eight healthy, trained males did 2 maximum-effort tests on bikes with and without compression stockings. Post-exercise lactate removal was significantly faster with compression stockings.
Wise Guy
RE: Compression Socks... do they work? 5/3/2011 5:58PM - in reply to slipstreamer Reply | Return to Index | Report Post
Just make sure you turn them inside out or look inside them or something before you put your foot in there.
14:45 5K
RE: Compression Socks... do they work? 5/3/2011 6:43PM - in reply to canadian runner Reply | Return to Index | Report Post
I've had stress fracture problems in my lower tibias as well and experience a lot of soreness in that area still. Do you think compression socks would help?[/quote]

I went from a 5K PR of 15:30 to 14:45 over the course of two months after I started wearing compression socks. Not sure it was entirely the compression socks, but I suspect they had something to do with it.
Rock the Socks
RE: Compression Socks... do they work? 5/3/2011 8:11PM - in reply to canadian runner Reply | Return to Index | Report Post
I don't do a long run or marathon without compression socks. I also wear them on flights, as well as after a long run or marathon. They prevent me from getting calf cramps, and overall my legs feel so much better with them.

A while ago I spent $80 on a pair of CEP socks. Since then I've found other kinds for half the price at the Running Room as well as various race expos. But the CEP remain the best pair I've spent money on; although I've owned them the longest, they are still in tip-top shape, unlike my other ones.

I agree that they look kind of dumb but I don't care; they work!
long sox
RE: Compression Socks... do they work? 5/3/2011 10:31PM - in reply to txRUNNERgirl Reply | Return to Index | Report Post
I noticed using them in recovery helped my shin pain too.
Can't make any other claims.
claims schmlaims
RE: Compression Socks... do they work? 5/4/2011 5:58AM - in reply to long sox Reply | Return to Index | Report Post
Do they smell?
StormChaser23
RE: Compression Socks... do they work? 5/12/2011 8:51AM - in reply to claims schmlaims Reply | Return to Index | Report Post
no.
RU listening?
RE: Compression Socks... do they work? 5/25/2011 9:05PM - in reply to Rock the Socks Reply | Return to Index | Report Post
I have a pair of CEP sleeves that retail for $40. They're a size 3, which would fit anyone with regular-sized calfs.

If anyone is interested in taking them off my hands for around $15, let me know and I'll provide my info.

They're all black, btw
Erwin Straus
RE: Compression Socks... do they work? 5/25/2011 9:26PM - in reply to canadian runner Reply | Return to Index | Report Post
They clearly could not hurt. But on the positive side two things can be said. First, the science is straightforward that they mitigate blood pooling in the feet and legs and push it back toward the heart. Second, almost all cardiologists recommend it to their patients with severe coronary disease as a way of helping blood flow to the heart. I should add there's a good deal of anecdotal "evidence" that they reduce fatigue in people who wear them during the course of the day.

canadian runner wrote:

I'm looking into buying a pair of CEP compression socks and I'm just curious about people's thoughts on whether compression socks really improve recovery, reduce fatigue, optimize performance, etc.

http://www.cepsocks.com/cep-running-progressive-compression-socks.html

I've had stress fracture problems in my lower tibias as well and experience a lot of soreness in that area still. Do you think compression socks would help?
adfdf
RE: Compression Socks... do they work? 5/25/2011 9:36PM - in reply to Reply | Return to Index | Report Post
9 years of not being able to run more than 3 mos. I had orthotics, motion control shoes all the way to nike free's. Constant lower leg tibia problems and injuries. Always felt like I was getting stress fractures. Constant problems with the periosteum always getting inflamed. I tried compression socks with absolutely no thinking that they would help or would work since nothing else did. I went to every kind of doctor from orthopedist to podiatrist. Compression socks have allowed me to have my life back, get them. I never get injured now.
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