wants to coach
How to become a high school track and cross country coach 4/3/2011 9:32AM Reply | Return to Index | Report Post
Since I started running in high school I knew that I wanted to be a cross country coach. I am now a freshman in college (still running competitivley) and as of right now is getting a physical education major. In most cases I here you have to teach to coach, but in some cases you do not have to teach. Is there any majors out there that would give me a better chance at getting a teaching job, so I could become a coach?

Thanks for all your help.
Another Option
RE: How to become a high school track and cross country coach 4/3/2011 1:53PM - in reply to wants to coach Reply | Return to Index | Report Post
I sense this is an attempt at trolling, but if it isn't...

* Teaching is probably the best way to land a job as a cross-country coach, but it doesn't make it automatic. You have to get a teaching job at a school where they also need a cross-country coach. That really limits your options.

* The market is flooded with those who have Phys Ed majors. You will give yourself a better shot at getting a teaching job if you are certified in Math, Comprehensive Science, or Special Education.

Please do not go into teaching if you only want to coach. Your passion has to be for the success of students in your classroom.

I believe financial pressures are going to drive scholastic sports out of our schools and into club settings. Find your career passion and get on the front end of the future by developing your own club team in your spare time.
a plan
RE: How to become a high school track and cross country coach 4/3/2011 5:51PM - in reply to wants to coach Reply | Return to Index | Report Post
Major in something you'd like to teach - don't limit yourself to Phys Ed, by any means. All of my XC coaches were math teachers, and most of the coaches in our league now are math teachers (go figure). As a walk-on, I'm the odd man out.

It would probably help to start at a school that doesn't value XC much - maybe they have a non-runner coaching out of desperation, and would be interested in a real runner coaching their kids right away, instead of you waiting for a good coach to retire.

If you're in Cali, check espn/dyestatcal for info about open coaching positions - it's even linked on their front page.

You may not get lucky and land a coaching job with your first teaching job - my favorite coach waited years for his 'dream job' to open up at a high school on the Central Coast of California.

Good luck.

PS: You can start padding your resume by looking for an assistant coach / volunteer position at a high school close to your college. Getting your foot in the door can help - maybe a rival school sees you coach, and you let your intentions be known, and when they have an opening of their own, you're already known by the coaches in the area, which can help you get a job.

And it doesn't hurt to know someone. If you have a 'friend of a friend' who knows about an opening, chase it down.
Racehorse
RE: How to become a high school track and cross country coach 4/5/2011 10:56AM - in reply to a plan Reply | Return to Index | Report Post

a plan wrote:

Major in something you'd like to teach - don't limit yourself to Phys Ed, by any means. All of my XC coaches were math teachers, and most of the coaches in our league now are math teachers (go figure). As a walk-on, I'm the odd man out.

It would probably help to start at a school that doesn't value XC much - maybe they have a non-runner coaching out of desperation, and would be interested in a real runner coaching their kids right away, instead of you waiting for a good coach to retire.

If you're in Cali, check espn/dyestatcal for info about open coaching positions - it's even linked on their front page.

You may not get lucky and land a coaching job with your first teaching job - my favorite coach waited years for his 'dream job' to open up at a high school on the Central Coast of California.

Good luck.

PS: You can start padding your resume by looking for an assistant coach / volunteer position at a high school close to your college. Getting your foot in the door can help - maybe a rival school sees you coach, and you let your intentions be known, and when they have an opening of their own, you're already known by the coaches in the area, which can help you get a job.

And it doesn't hurt to know someone. If you have a 'friend of a friend' who knows about an opening, chase it down.


This^^^^

Volunteer first with an older coach or a team with an older coach nearby. Your abilities will be evident to those looking to hire a coach. Unfortunately, most do not hire a CC coach first, but a teacher for the subject, and fill the position from existing staff.

I had to start as a volunteer assistant and wait for the paid one to quit to get the position.
CT Coach
RE: How to become a high school track and cross country coach 4/5/2011 5:01PM - in reply to Racehorse Reply | Return to Index | Report Post
Get the most out of your competive running career before you even think about coaching. Don't try to volunteer as a coach because you need to focus on your own running right now. There is plenty of time to get experience as a coach, but your own running career has limits. Once you get into coaching, it will be harder to teach, coach and train to your ability. Maybe find a way to officiate at local meets and get to know local coaches so you get your name out there. But mostly, spend as much time learning from your coach.
That Guy
RE: How to become a high school track and cross country coach 4/5/2011 5:13PM - in reply to CT Coach Reply | Return to Index | Report Post
DO NOT BECOME A TEACHER SO YOU CAN COACH...you'll be doing the rest of our kids a favor.

I almost made this mistake until I realized how much I hated being around kids for that long. And good lucking finding a PE teaching job, that was a major reason I quit that program. You'll more than likely have to move somewhere you don't want to live to teach at some shitty school where no one gives 2 shits about running.

Honestly this is the sad truth of things. I was in my school's teaching program for 2 years before realizing how bad of a life choice I was about to make. After talking to my old HS coaches and teachers, they where more then thrilled to have me come back and help coach their program. Having a good amount of success and school records definitely helped me out...

Really if you want to coach, get in with the running community around your area. Go to a couple track meets, talk to some coaches when they aren't busy, talk to the school's AD who you want to coach for...it's really not that hard.

Becoming a teacher just to coach will make you miserable (unless you love teaching PE but I doubt you do). You'll more than likely have to sacrifice where to live, you'll get paid next to nothing, and you'll be putting in extra hours for a team that has no garuntee for success. People just don't give up PE jobs, those are pretty kush positions.