Aqua413
Motivating tools for high school cross country runners 5/16/2007 12:36PM Reply | Return to Index | Report Post
What are some things that I could use, or that some of you use as coaches in order to motivate your athletes?
i know
RE: Motivating tools for high school cross country runners 5/16/2007 12:39PM - in reply to Aqua413 Reply | Return to Index | Report Post
Food (esp. candy)
Jizzle
RE: Motivating tools for high school cross country runners 5/16/2007 12:44PM - in reply to Aqua413 Reply | Return to Index | Report Post
Liquor can work well with hs kids, but be careful not to get caught. Warn the kids not to drive when they drink.
Better than candy
RE: Motivating tools for high school cross country runners 5/16/2007 12:47PM - in reply to i know Reply | Return to Index | Report Post

i know wrote:

Food (esp. candy)


How about a roll in bed with honey?
Serious?
RE: Motivating tools for high school cross country runners 5/16/2007 12:57PM - in reply to Aqua413 Reply | Return to Index | Report Post
Cash, drugs, hookers.
Harry Kooter
RE: Motivating tools for high school cross country runners 5/16/2007 1:09PM - in reply to Aqua413 Reply | Return to Index | Report Post
I have always felt like the motivation has to be intrinsic. There are ways to bring out intrinsic motivation, but some small prize or reward just isn't enough to get someone to push themselves through everything that is required to be successful in xc. I think that letting your runners set their own team and indivdual goals is important. An athlete is far more motivated to attain a goal that they have set for themselves than they are to attain a goal that has been set for them.
Harry Kooter
RE: Motivating tools for high school cross country runners 5/16/2007 1:29PM - in reply to Harry Kooter Reply | Return to Index | Report Post
Just to elaborate on the idea of having your runners set their own goals: The purpose of doing this is to essentially allow your guys to tell you how hard they want to/are willing to work. You can design the season and the workouts around acheiving the goals that they have set. If your team tells you that they want to be in the top ten at states, set the workouts up accordingly. If athletes complain about the difficulty of the program or stop attacking the workouts mid way through the season, tell them that they can get together and decide on an easier team goal if they are no longer willing to make the sacrifices to achieve the original. This forces the athlete to really consider what they are giving up when they look for the easy way out.